§ 633.Louis-Napoleon in the beginning, in the middle and in the end

19th century:
§633. Louis-Napoleon in the beginning, in the middle and in the end (1848-1870): VIII-43.

VIII-43:
On account of the fall of the two bastard things,
The nephew by blood shall occupy the reign.
Into the vehicle shall be the strokes of darts,
The nephew for fear shall fold the ensign.


(Par le decide de deux choses bastars
Nepveu du sang occupera le regne
Dedans lectoyre seront les cops de darts
Nepveu par peur pleira l'enseigne.)

Keys to the reading:
Par (vers 1& 4): Preposition for a cause, a reason (Brunot & Bruneau);

Le decide (the fall): from decido, tomber, déchoir (to fall, to decline) (Torné-Chavigny, 1860, p.76);

The two bastard things: The July monarchy (1830.8.9-1848.2.24) and the republican government following it (1848.2.24-1848.12.20), « the word bastard being interpreted often as government of fact and without legitimacy» (Torné-Chavigny, id.). In fact, of 8 uses of the word in the Prophecies, 5 refer to such a ruler or government (III-73, III-80, V-15, VIII-43 and IX-19), and 3 are in the proper sense (V-45, VIII-24 and VIII-50);

The nephew by blood: Louis-Napoleon, a genuine nephew of the emperor Napoleon Ist, elected President of the Republic of France on the 20th of December, 1848;

lectoyre: Etymologically the same as lictiere (litière) (litter) (§383, I-3: for the royal litter, a symbol of Louis XVI or of the Bourbon dynasty): « litière, Sänfte (litter), from Gallorom. lectaria to Lat. lectarius (belonging to the rest) » (Gamillscheg). The orthography "lectoire" is more literal than lictiere: : Lat. lectus (rest, bed) (Walde) + oire (suffix for a place) (cf. Vignois, 1910, p.239). A neologism of Nostradamus for an imperial vehicle of Napoleon III, as a modern substitute for a litter (litière);

Cops: = coups (blows, strokes). Another example of cop for coup, cf. VIII-41;

Darts: It having been bombs thrown and flown to the victims like a dart as to the arms striking Napoleon III in 1858;

Pleira: = pliera, by the attraction of a Romance verb: pleiar (Clébert, 2003, p.889);

Summary:
The nephew by blood shall occupy the reign: « The formation of the constitution having been at length concluded, it was finally adopted, on the 4th of November, by a majority of 737 to thirty votes. By the constitution thus adopted, the form of government in France was declared to be republican, the electors being chosen by universal suffrage, and the president in the same way. The right of the working classes to employment was negatived, it being declared, however, that the government, so far as its resources went, was to furnish labour to the unemployed. The punishment of death was abolished in purely political offences. Slavery was to be abolished in every part of the French dominions. The right of association and public meeting was guaranteed; voting, whether for tne representatives or the president, was to be by ballot; the representatives once chosen might be re-elected any number of times. The president required to be a French citizen, of at least thirty years of age, and one who had not lost on any occasion his right of citizenship. He was to be elected for four years, and a simple majority was to determine the election. The president was re-eligible after having served the first four years; he was to reside in the palace of the assembly, and receive a salary of six himdred thousand francs a year. All the ministers of state were to be appointed by the president, who also was to command the armed force, declare peace and war, conduct negotiations with foreign powers, and generally exercise all the powers of sovereignty, with the exception of appointing the judges of the supreme courts in Paris, who were to be named by the assembly, and to hold their offices for life. Disguised under the form of a republic, this constitution was in reality monarchical, for the president was invested with all the substantial power of sovereignty; and as he was capable of being re-elected, his tenure of office might be prolonged for an indefinite period. Though there were several candidates for the high office, yet it was soon apparent that the suffrage would really come to be divided between two - General Cavaignac and Prince Louis Napoleon.» (HH, XIII, p.104-105)

« Both Prince Louis Napoleon Bonaparte and General Cavaignac had exceptional advantages: the first, that of a great name; the second, that of the immense resources with which executive power is necessarily invested. But in addition to the advantage of his name, Prince Louis Napoleon Bonaparte belonged to no party whatsoever. Isolated between the army of socialism and the "party of order,'' he offered in his very person a sort of compromise. His attitude, his remoteness from the stormy debates of the chamber rendered his conduct conformable with his situation. In his seclusion at Auteuil, he had held conferences with men of all parties. All could place some of their hopes on him, without his binding himself to any single one. He belonged at the same time to the democracy, on account of the worship of the proletariat for the name of Napoleon; to socialism, by a few of his pamphlets; and to the party of order by the religious and military tendencies of his policy: and this is what no one in those times of blindness perceived. In the election of December 10th, 1,448,302 votes were returned for General Cavaignac, whilst Louis Napoleon Bonaparte obtained 5,534,520; Ledru-Rollin had 371,434 suffrages, Raspail 36,964, and Lamartine, who had once been simultaneously elected by ten departments, received a dole of 17,914 votes. The election of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte greatly surpised many zealous minds; and seriously disturbed the dreamers. Like carrion crows wheeling round to seek their route and filling the air with their cries, they were seen raising their heads and scenting the wind, seeking the meaning of an event they could not comprehend. Louis Napoleon Bonaparte appeared upon the scene like Fortinbras at the end of Hamlet. Brutal in fact, his election cut the knot of a thousand intrigues. The people, by their vote, had expressed the idea of a great popular dictatorship which put an end to the quarrels of the citizens, to the subtlety of utopians, to party rancour, and guarded them against the endlessly recurring crises engendered by the parliamentary regime amongst nations with whom sentiment dominates reason, action and discussion. The poll also expressed an ardent desire for unity. The proletariat knows well that what takes place in the republic of barristers and landlords concerns it but little. It was by analogous reasons that Cæsar triumphed in Rome. Having nothing to gain from party struggles, knowing by experience that for them the only result is lack of work, imprisonment, exile, or death, the people always aspire to rise above them. Louis Bonaparte, in his electoral address, was careful to give expression to this thought: "Let us be men of the country," he said, "not men of a party!" Louis Napoleon Bonaparte was proclaimed president of the republic on December 20th at four o'clock, by the president of the national assembly.» (HH, XIII, p.105-107)

Into the vehicle shall be the strokes of darts: « Orsini's attempt to kill the Emperor. The evening of the 14th of January, 1858, at the moment of the arrival of the emperor and empress at the opera, three explosions were heard. Three bombs had been thrown at the emperor's carriage. Cries of grief and horror resounded on all sides. The bursting of the projectiles had injured more than one hundred and forty persons, some of whom were mortally wounded. The carriage of the emperor was broken and one of the horses killed. A terrible anxiety filled the opera house as the royal pair entered their box; both had escaped injury. The police arrested four Italians. It was seen immediately that three of them were but instruments; the fourth, Orsini, was remarquable in every way. His father had perished in 1831 in the insurrection against the pope in which Napoleon III and his elder brother had taken part. The son since his childhood had taken part in all the national Italian conspiracies. In its form the attempt on Napoleon III recalled that of Fieschi under Louis Philippe; but in reality there was a wide gulf between the Corsican bandit of 1835 and the Roman conspirator of 1858. In spite of the horror of a crime which took aim at its object across so many indifferent and unknown victims, Orsini inspired in all those who saw and heard him during his trial an interest which it was impossible to withstand. This man had been actuated solely by an impersonal passion; he was under the spell of a misdirected patriotism. He had chosen as his counsel Jules Favre, who defended him as he wished to be defended, by endeavouring to save, not his head, but his memory as far as it could be saved. A profound impression was made on the audience when Jules Favre, by permission of the emperor, read aloud a letter addressed to the latter by Orsini. The criminal did not ask mercy for himself; he asked freedom for his unhappy country, ''the constant object of all his affections." He did not go so far as to demand that the blood of Frenchmen should be shed for the Italians, but only that France should interdict the support of Austria by Germany - "in the struggles which are perhaps soon to begin. I adjure your majesty,'' he wrote, " to restore to Italy the independence which her children lost in 1849 by the fault of the French themselves (by the war of Rome). Let not your majesty repulse the last wish of a patriot on the steps of the scaffold!" » (HH, XIII, p.132-133)

« Orsini and his accomplices were condemned to death on the 26th of February. Orsini thanked the emperor for having authorised the publication of his letter. His second letter was not less moving than the first. He formally condemned political assassination and disavowed "the fatal aberration of mind" whicn had led him to prepare his crime. He exhorted his compatriots to employ only their abnegation, their devotion, their union, their virtue to deliver their country. He himself offered his blood in expiation to the victims of the 14th of January. The question of the commutation of the penalty was energetically agitated by those about the emperor. Napoleon would have judged such mercy politic if so many victims had not been struck by the instruments of death intended for his own person. Orsini was executed on the 14th of March, with one of his accomplices. He died without display as without weakness, crying, " Vive l'Italie! Vive la France!" His death was soon to bring forth happy results to Italy. Before that his crime had had deplorable ones for France. In 1801 the first consul had made the affair of the infernal machine prepared by some royalists a pretext for proscribing a host of republicans. Napoleon III imitated and surpassed his uncle.» (HH, XIII, p.133).

The nephew for fear shall fold the ensign: « [September 1870] The surrender of Napoleon III. At five o'clock all was ended. The emperor sent the following letter to the king of Prussia by one of his aides-de-camp:

Monsieur mon frère:

Not having succeeded in dying in the midst of my troops, nothing remains for me but to deliver my sword into your majesty's hands.

The king replied:

While I regret the circumstances in which we meet, I accept your majesty's sword and beg you to be so good as to name one of your officers furnished with full powers to make terms for the capitulation of the army which has fought so bravely under your command. On my side, I have named General von Moltke for this purpose.

Napoleon III could surrender his person - he was no longer a general; it was not his work to surrender the army. Another was to be entrusted with this mission. Wimpffen, with despair at his heart, was obliged to submit to it. He went over to the enemy's headquarters, to the castle of Bellevue, near Donchery. For three long hours Wimpffen struggled in vain to obtain some modification of the conditions which Moltke had fixed. This cold and inflexible calculator, who had reduced war to mathematical formulas, was as incapable of generosity as of anger. He had decided that the entire army, with arms and baggage, should be prisoners.» (HH, XIII, p.160)

As to the case of Orsini, cf. §644, V-8; §645, V-9; §646, V-10.

As to the Franco-Prussian war, cf. §682(X-30), §683(III-13), §687(V-30), §688(III-69), §689(I-64), §690(VI-33), §691(II-26), §692(V-100), §693(V-81) and §695(VI-34).

Discussion:
Many interpreters tried to set up the word lectoyre as an enigma and then to solve it in superfluous ways. For example, « Charles Nicoullaud [1914, p.201], whose study of Nostradamus appeared in 1914, has the brilliant notion of treating the whole phrase 'dedans Lectoyre' as an anagram and transforming it into 'Sedan le decroyt', that is 'Sedan deposes him'. But this is altogether too clever. That Nostradamus used anagrams to conceal proper names is admitted by every one who has studied the subject, but there is obviously no limit to what you can do in this way with phrases and sentences. Charles A. Ward [1891, p.295f.] made the interesting discovery that Blaew's [Blaeuw's] map, printed in Amsterdam in 1620, shows the meadowland on the opposite side of the Meuse from Sedan inscribed with the names of Grand Torcy and Petit Torcy. Now Lectoyre is the precise anagram, letter for letter, of Le Torcey. Even if this be nothing but a coincidence it is certainly a very happy one.» (Laver, 1942, p.213)

But, the defeat of Napoleon III in Sedan was such a unique one during his whole reign as not to demand a mention of the name of Sedan, in addition to the exposition of the fact of defeat, to mark it. Only a natural perception of the verse 3 associated with one of the most distinct events in his reign in 1858 suffices for its complete interpretation.
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§ 634.Louis-Napoleon's grand prowess

19th century:
§634. Louis-Napoleon's grand prowess (1840-1858): IV-65.
IV-65:
To the deserter of the grand fortress,
He who shall have abandoned his post :
After him his adversary shall achieve such a grand prowess,
The Emperor a condemned shall be soon executed.


(Au deserteur de la grand forteresse,
Apres qu'aura son lieu abandonné:
Son adversaire fera si grand prouesse,
L'Empereur tost mort sera condemné.)

Keys to the reading:
The deserter of the grand fortress: Louis-Napoleon, who escapes to England in 1846 from the castle of Ham, where he has been imprisoned since 1840 (Torné-Chavigny, 1860, p.84-85). As to his return to France, cf.§630,VII-43: Shall flee the nephew smiling;

qu'aura: = qui aura;

He who shall have abandoned his post to the deserter: Louis-Philip (Torné-Chavigny, id.);

His adversary: Louis-Napoleon (Torné-Chavigny, id., p.85).;

Son adversaire fera si grand prouesse, L'Empereur tost mort sera condemné: The construction should be: His adversary shall achieve such a grand prowess, [i.e.] the Emperor [;] a condemned shall be soon executed;

A condemned: Orsini.

Summary:
The Strasburg Bonapartist plot: « This ministry [of Molé] had not been in existence two months when the attempt made at Strasburg by Louis Bonaparte took place. The nephew of Napoleon I had been living for some years at the castle of Arenenberg in Switzerland with his mother, and was a captain of artillery in the Swiss army. The continual risings which took place in France, and the letters of his partisans, made him believe that the time had come for attempting, by means of a military revolution, to replace on the throne the Napoleonic dynasty of which he was the head now that the duke of Reichstadt was dead. He had succeeded in opening communications with the garrison of Strasburg. On the 29th of October, 1836, he arrived at Strasburg. The next day at five o'clock in the morning. Colonel Vaudrey presented him to the fourth artillery regiment. For a few moments he succeeded in arousing the enthusiasm of the soldiers who cried "Long live Napoleon ! Long live the Emperor I " But the 46th line regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Taillandier, turned a deaf ear to these outcries and remained faithful to their duty. By order of their commanding officer, the infantry surrounded Louis Bonaparte and took him prisoner. Louis Philippe sent him to America. The other conspirators were brought to trial and acquitted, for the jury were unwilling to pronounce them guilty when the chief culprit had been sent away unpunished.» (HH, XIII, p.70)

Louis-Napoleon's second attempt at a coup d'état: « Louis Philippe left Paris for his castle of Eu, where he had given a rendezvous to MM. Thiers and Guizot for the purpose of discussing Eastern affairs. There he received strange tidings: Louis Napoleon had landed at Boulogne on August 6th, 1840. The latter, since he had transferred his residence to England, had recommenced the same operations as in Switzerland. He believed he could count upon the commander of the departement du Nord, General Magnan, who, later on, was to be one of his chief accomplices on December 2nd. He had even entered into relations with a higher official, Marshal Clausel. He determined to land near Boulogne, purposing to capture the small garrison of that town, to seize the castle, which contained a gun magazine, then to direct his steps towards the departement du Nord, and from thence to Paris. He prepared declamatory proclamations wherein he promised to the soldiers " glory, honour, wealth," and to the people reduction of taxes, order, and liberty. " Soldiers," he said, " the great spirit of Napoleon speaks to you through me. Traitors, be gone, the Napoleonic spirit, which cares but for the welfare of the nation, advances to overwhelm you ! " He asserted that he had powerful friends abroad as well as at home, who had promised to uphold him; this was an allusion to Russia, whose support he believed he possessed and from whom he had very probably received some encouragement. In a sketch of a decree, he named Thiers president of the provisional government, and Marshal Clausel, commander of the Army of Paris. His plans thus laid, he left London by steamer, with General Montholon, several officers, about sixty men, and an eagle, destined to play the part of a living symbol in the forthcoming drama. The expedition landed at night at Vimereux, north of Boulogne, and proceeded to that town. The confederates entered the courtyard of the barracks of the 42nd regiment of the line. A lieutenant, who was for Napoleon, had mustered the men and told them that Louis Philippe reigned no longer; then Louis Bonaparte harangued them. Confused, fascinated, they were beginning to shout " Long live the emperor," when there appeared upon the scene a captain, who, breaking through the confederates, and regardless of their threats, summoned the non-commissioned officers and men to his side. Louis Bonaparte fired a pistol at him, but it missed him and wounded a grenadier; the soldiers rallied round their captain. The confederates left the barracks without delay, and ascended to the castle, but they were unable to break in the doors. None of the townspeople had joined them. The rappel was sounded, and the national guard assembled, but against them. They left the town and retreated to the foot of the column raised in Napoleon's time in honour of the Grande Armée. The national guard and the line regiment advanced upon them. They disappeared. Louis Bonaparte and a few of his followers fled towards the sea and swam to a yawl, in which they attempted to regain their vessel. The national guards opened fire upon the fugitives, several of whom were severely wounded; the yawl capsized and a spent bullet struck Louis Bonaparte. Two of his accomplices perished, one was shot, the other drowned. Louis Bonaparte survived. The pretender was this time arraigned with his accomplices before the court of peers, which condemned him to imprisonment for life (October 6th). He was imprisoned in the castle of Ham, in the same chamber where Polignac had been confined. This non-capital sentence confirmed in effect the abolition of the death penalty in political affairs, which had been implied in the pardon of Barbès. This attempt, even more feebly conceived than that of Strasburg, had thus failed still more miserably. The pretender had made himself ridiculous in the eyes of the enlightened and educated classes, who perused the newspapers and knew the details of his adventures. But it was a great mistake to look upon him now as harmless, and to forget that the majority are not in the habit of reading.» (HH, XIII, p.73-75)

After him his adversary shall achieve such a grand prowess, the Emperor: « Presidential election in 1848. Disguised under the form of a republic, this constitution was in reality monarchical, for the president was invested with all the substantial power of sovereignty; and as he was capable of being re-elected, his tenure of office might be prolonged for an indefinite period. Though there were several candidates for the high office, yet it was soon apparent that the suffrage would really come to be divided between two - General Cavaignac and Prince Louis Napoleon. The door had already been opened to the latter by an election which took place at Paris on the 17th of September, when the young prince was again elected by a large majority. Four other departments in the country had already elected him. On this occasion he no longer hesitated, but accepted his election for the department of the Seine. He took his seat on the 26th of September, and made the following speech on the occasion, which was very favourably received by the assembly:

"After three-and-thirty years of proscription and exile, I at length find myself among you, I again regain my country and my rights as one of its citizens. It is to the republic that I owe that happiness: let the republic then receive my oath of gratitude, of devotion; and let my generous fellow-citizens, to whom I am indebted for my seat in its legislature, feel assured that I will strive to justify their suffrages, by labouring with you for the maintenance of tranquillity, the first necessity of the country, and for the development of the democratic institutions which the country is entitled to reclaim. My conduct, ever guided by a sense of duty and respect for the laws, will prove, in opposition to the passions by which I have been maligned and still am blackened, that none is more anxious than I am to devote myself to the defence of order and the consolidation of the republic."

Both Prince Louis Napoleon Bonaparte and General Cavaignac had exceptional advantages: the first, that of a great name; the second, that of the immense resources with which executive power is necessarily invested.» (HH, XIII, p.105)

« The appeal to the people. The struggle had come to an end; it had been replaced by the terrorising of the conquered. Thirty-two departments were in a stage of siege. Nearly one hundred thousand citizens were captives in the prisons or the fortresses. The casemates of the forts about Paris were overflowmg with prisoners. The examining magistrates proceeded to summary interrogations, after which the persons detained were sent before military commissions. The latter, in accordance with the dossiers of the police and a few words added by the judges to those notes, classed the prisoners in one of these three categories: (1) Persons taken with arms in their hands or against whom grave charges are brought; (2) Persons against whom less grave charges are brought; (3) Dangerous persons. The first category was to be judged summarily by court martial; the second sent before various tribunals; the third deported without sentence. It was under such conditions that the vote on the appeal to the people was proceeded with on the 20th and 21st of December [1851]. The consultative commission instituted by Louis Napoleon on the 3rd of December was entrusted with the counting of the ballot of the appeal to the people. It reported 7,439,216 ayes, 646,737 noes, 36,880 papers rejected. At Paris there had been 132,181 ayes, 80,601 noes, 3,200 rejected papers; 76,000 electors had not voted. On the morning of that day of the year which opened a period so different from that on which many hopes had waited in 1852, a decree had substituted the imperial eagle of Rome for the cock by whicn the constitutional monarchy and the republic recalled ancient Gaul. Another decree announced that the chief of the state was about to take the Tuileries for his residence. Whilst the man of the 2nd of December was installing himself in the palace of the kings, the chief representatives of the republic were driven into exile.» (HH, XIII, p.122-124)

« Napoleon's address at Bordeaux, 1852: Master of himself in the midst of the general enthusiasm, Louis Napoleon was preparing for the great speech which would definitely decide his destiny and the destiny of France. It was made at Bordeaux on the 9th of October, at the close of a banquet which had been given him by the chamber of commerce. Contrary to his custom he went straight to the point: " I say with a frankness as far removed from pride as from false modesty,that never has any nation manifested in a more direct, more spontaneous, more unanimous manner its wish to rid itself of all anxiety as to the future, by strengthening under one control the government which is sympathetic to it. The reason is that this people now realises both the false hopes which lulled it and the perils which threatened it. It knows that in 1852 Society was hurrying to its downfall. It is grateful to me for having saved the ship by setting up only the flag of France. Disabused of absurd theories, the nation has acquired the conviction that its so-called reformers were but dreamers, for there was always an inconsistency, a disproportion, between their resources and the promised results. To bring about the well-being of the country it is not necessary to apply new methods, but to give it, before all else, confidence in the present and security as to the future. These are the reasons why France appears anxious to revert to an empire." The important word had at last been uttered. With insinuating cleverness Louis Napoleon also brought forward the principal objection to the scheme: "There is an apprehension abroad of which I must take note. In a spirit of distrust, certain persons are saying that imperialism means war. I say imperialism means peace. It means peace because France desires it, and when France is satisfied the world is at rest. Glory may well be bequeathed as an inheritance, but not war. Did those princes who were justly proud of being descendants of Louis XIV revive his quarrels? War is not made for pleasure, but by necessity; and in these times of transition when, side by side with so many elements of prosperity, on every hand so many causes of death arise, one may truly say: 'Woe unto him who first gives the signal in Europe for a collision whose consequences would be incalculable.'" Prolonged cheers greeted these sentiments of pacific pride. The enthusiasm became tinged with emotion when the prince, continuing, outlined in superb language the programme of his future government - a stately plan for an edifice never, alas! erected. On the 10th of October the presidential address, "The Bordeaux Speech" as it was promptly dubbed, was telegraphed to Paris. So dignified, conciliatory, and loyal did its language appear, that it instantly produced an emotion which was not artificial or simulated, but profound and sincere, Louis Napoleon visited in rapid succession Angoulême, Rochefort, La Rochelle, and Tours; he made a last halt at Amboise and there, to impress the public fancy by some new and striking act, he set free the imprisoned Abdul-Kadir. At two o'clock in the afternoon of the 16th of October, he arrived in Paris, and was received with full official pomp and circumstance.» (HH, XIII, p.126-127)

THE ACCESSION OF NAPOLEON III : « On December 1st, 1852, at eight o'clock in the evening, in the midst of a thick fog, two hundred carriages, lighted by torchbearers on horseback, crossed the bridge of Boulogne, and went in the direction of the palace of St. Cloud, the windows of which were seen shining from afar; the members of the senate occupied these carriages; they carried the prince-president the decree of the senate which named him emperor. The fête of the proclamation of the empire was very similar to that of the return of the prince-president, and curiosity began to be exhausted: the same flags, the same uniforms, the same people, the same decorations, a smaller crowd in the streets, but more animation in the theme. The new government, by way of a gift to celebrate the joyous accession, delivered from imprisonment and fine those who were condemned for misdemeanours and infractions of the laws covering the press and the book trade: official warnings which had been sent to the journals were considered null and void; there was to be no amnesty; exiles might return "if they acknowledged the national will," that is, if they demanded pardon. A banquet for sixty persons and a simple reception at the residence of the sovereign ended the evening. At midnight a new guest slept in the Tuileries. So began the reign which was to finish at Sedan.» (HH, XIII, p.127-128)

A condemned shall be soon executed: « The evening of the 14th of January, 1858, at the moment of the arrival of the emperor and empress at the opera, three explosions were heard. The police arrested four Italians, three of them were but instruments; the fourth, Orsini, was remarquable. His father had perished in 1831 in the insurrection against the pope in which Napoleon III and his elder brother had taken part. The son since his childhood had taken part in all the national Italian conspiracies. A profound impression was made on the audience when Jules Favre, by permission of the emperor, read aloud a letter addressed to the latter by Orsini. The criminal did not ask mercy for himself; he asked freedom for his unhappy country. He did not go so far as to demand that the blood of Frenchmen should be shed for the Italians, but only that France should interdict the support of Austria by Germany. Orsini and his accomplices were condemned to death on the 26th of February. The question of the commutation of the penalty was energetically agitated by those about the emperor. Napoleon would have judged such mercy politic if so many victims had not been struck by the instruments of death intended for his own person. Orsini was executed on the 14th of March, with one of his accomplices.» (HH, XIII, p.132-133).

As to the case of Orsini, cf. §633(VIII-43), §644(V-8),§645(V-9), §646(V-10).
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© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2012. All rights reserved.

§ 635.Louis-Napoleon's unheard-of promotion

19th century:
§635. Louis-Napoleon's unheard-of promotion (1848-1870): VIII-53.

VIII-53:
In Boulogne he will want to wash his faults,
He shall not be able in the temple of the Sun,
He shall fly in achieving so honorable things.
In hierarchy none shall have been heightened like him.


(Dedans Bolongne vouldra laver ses fautes,
Il ne pourra au temple du soleil,
Il volera faisant choses si haultes
En hierarchie n'en fut oncq un pareil.)

Keys to the reading:
The construction of the verses 1-3 should be: In Boulogne he will want to wash his faults, He shall not be able; in the temple of the Sun, He shall fly in achieving so honorable things;

Bolongne: Boulogne-sur-Mer en France (Torné-Chavigny, 1860, p.80);

His faults: Louis-Napoleon's failing coup d'état in Strasburg in 1836;

The temple of the Sun: France as predicted by the Prophet, temple in its Latin origin templum signifying a demarcated space where the fortuneteller catches a prefiguration (Torné-Chavigny, id., p.13), and the Sun being a symbol of France in its glory (Torné-Chavigny, id., p.81). As to the temple as France, cf. III-6, III-45, VI-1, VI-16(§618), VI-22, VI-65, IX-21(§388) and X-81bis. As to the Sun as French kings, see Discussion below.

Summary:
The Strasburg Bonapartist plot failed (1836): « The nephew of Napoleon I had been living for some years at the castle of Arenenberg in Switzerland with his mother. The continual risings which took place in France, and the letters of his partisans, made him believe that the time had come for attempting, by means of a military revolution, to replace on the throne the Napoleonic dynasty. He had succeeded in opening communications with the garrison of Strasburg. On the 29th of October, 1836, he arrived at Strasburg. The next day at five o'clock in the morning. Colonel Vaudrey presented him to the fourth artillery regiment. For a few moments he succeeded in arousing the enthusiasm of the soldiers who cried "Long live Napoleon ! Long live the Emperor I " But the 46th line regiment turned a deaf ear to these outcries and remained faithful to their duty. By order of their commanding officer, the infantry surrounded Louis Bonaparte and took him prisoner. Louis Philippe sent him to America.» (HH, XIII, p.70)

Louis-Napoleon's second attempt at a coup d'état in Boulogne (1840): « Louis Philippe left Paris for his castle of Eu, where he had given a rendezvous to MM. Thiers and Guizot for the purpose of discussing Eastern affairs. There he received strange tidings: Louis Napoleon had landed at Boulogne on August 6th, 1840. The latter, since he had transferred his residence to England, had recommenced the same operations as in Switzerland. He believed he could count upon the commander of the departement du Nord, General Magnan, who, later on, was to be one of his chief accomplices on December 2nd. He prepared declamatory proclamations wherein he promised to the soldiers " glory, honour, wealth," and to the people reduction of taxes, order, and liberty. The expedition landed at night at Vimereux, north of Boulogne, and proceeded to that town. The confederates entered the courtyard of the barracks of the 42nd regiment of the line. A lieutenant, who was for Napoleon, had mustered the men and told them that Louis Philippe reigned no longer; then Louis Bonaparte harangued them. Confused, fascinated, they were beginning to shout " Long live the emperor," when there appeared upon the scene a captain, who, breaking through the confederates, and regardless of their threats, summoned the non-commissioned officers and men to his side. Louis Bonaparte fired a pistol at him, but it missed him and wounded a grenadier; the soldiers rallied round their captain. The confederates left the barracks and ascended to the castle, but they were unable to break in the doors. None of the townspeople had joined them. They left the town. The national guard and the line regiment advanced upon them. Louis Bonaparte and a few of his followers fled towards the sea and swam to a yawl, in which they attempted to regain their vessel. The national guards opened fire upon the fugitives; the yawl capsized and a spent bullet struck Louis Bonaparte. Two of his accomplices perished. Louis Bonaparte survived. The pretender was this time arraigned with his accomplices before the court of peers, which condemned him to imprisonment for life (October 6th). He was imprisoned in the castle of Ham.» (HH, XIII, p.73-75)

In the temple of the Sun, He shall fly in achieving so honorable things: E.g., the transformation of the town of Paris by Haussmann (1853f.) (cf. Seignobos, 1921, CVI, p.259-260) and the annexation of Savoy and Nice (1860) (cf. Seignobos, 1921, CVII, p.120).

In hierarchy none shall have been heightened like him: « And as a remarkable thing, the figure has become always bigger since four years ago. In 1848, it was five and a half millions; in 1851, seven and a half millions; in 1852, nearly eight millions. The popularity of the Prince mounted, mounted, mounted ever; and now it attained such an elevated summit that one could hardly believe it accessible to the ambition of anyone. In consideration of the growth of the population, one found yet, all the proportion strictly kept, that Napoleon the Ist himself had not been brought so high by the public favour and recognition.» (Guy, cité Torné-Chavigny, 1860, p.82).

Discussion:
P. Guinard (2011, p.95-96), essentially following Torné-Chavigny, interprets against him the temple of the Sun as the castle of Ham, where Louis-Napoleon was imprisoned. The quatrain IV-65(§634) calls the castle the grand fortress, which cannot be called temple in Nostradamus' vocabulary. For the term temple, 36 times in all in the Prophecies of Nostradamus, is used to signify 1° Christian churches, catholic or protestant (18 times), 2° ancient shrines (4 times), 3° France in the same sense as in this quatrain (10 times), 4° a demarcated space in its original sense (3 times) and 5° the tower of Temple in Paris (once, IX-23,§367), of these only the last in its proper name suggests a prison. Moreover, his interpretation does not fit the context, for he shall not be able to wash his faults in the castle of Ham, but in Boulogne, nor shall he fly in the castle of Ham, but all over France.

And Le Pelletier (I, p.287) advances the temple of the Sun as «the sky of Italy, the Sun being the emblem of Italy, more specifically of Rome, Sun of the Christendom and Universal Metropolis». Certainly this metaphor does not fail in ordinary domains of letters, but to attain the point in question we need more arguments concerning all the uses of the term in the Prophecies of Nostradamus. In fact, of 38 uses of the Sun (Sol, soleil), 13 are for the celetial body, 17 for persons like sovereigns, 4 for gold and money (IV-30, V-32, V-66 and VI-98), twice for Japan (V-11, V-62) and once for France (VIII-53) and once for soil or ground (I-57). And of 17 persons like sovereigns, 10 are Oriental kings (rising Sun), 6 are French kings: Henri II (VI-58,§36), Louis XVI (I-31,§344; III-34,§372; IX-19,§387), Louis XVIII (I-38) and Charles X (IV-84,§596) and once the pope (V-25). Now, the last unique example, namely that of V-25 for the pope is in the occasion of the battle of Lepant in 1571, where France was absent. So, the use of the term Sun for Italy, Rome or a pope is not preferable to France in Nostradamus in general. And as to the quatrain VIII-53, where the option of France is not merely excluded but also recommended by the context, it is reasonable to interpret the term as recommended. In fact, Napoleon III flourishes (fly) first and primarily in France (in the temple of the Sun) as her leader.
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© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2012. All rights reserved.

§ 636. Garibaldi fleed from Rome

19th century:
§636. Garibaldi fleed from Rome (1849): IX-54.

IX-54:
He shall arrive at the port of Corsibonne,
Near Ravenna that shall murder the lady,
In the profound sea a legate of Vlisbonne
Shall destroy seventy lives behind rocks.


(Arrivera au port de Corsibonne,
Pres de Ravenne qui pillera la dame,
En mer profonde legat de la Vlisbonne
Souz roc caichez raviront septante ames.)

Keys to the reading:
The port of Corsibonne: The port of Ravenna (Leoni, 1982(1961), p.396), representing Mesoli [Mesola], by the mouth of the Po, where Garibaldi landed (see below);

The lady: Anita Garibaldi, wife of Giuseppe Garibaldi, died near Ravenna in 1849;

In the profound sea: on the sea near Venice at the far end of the long sea of the Adriatic;

Vlisbonne: = V + Lisbon (Lisbonne for Lisbon to rime to Corsibonne), V representing Venice, Lisbon meaning etymologically "a good (bon) harbour (lis from Gk. limen: cf. Buck, s.v. Port)". Both Lisbon and Venice are "a good harbour";

Legat (legate): An expedition, légat derived from legatus in Latin (sent, dispatched);

Seventy lives (septante ames): A round number of the victims among «the occupants of the remaining nine barges» (see below).

Summary:
Siege of Rome: « The French by this time had planted twelve pieces of cannon in their breach and commanded therefrom the principal defences of Rome. Terrible was the havoc they made amongst the villas and palaces in the western part of the city, and Garibaldi who held the Villa Savorelli was obliged to abandon it on the evening of the 27th [June, 1849]. When forced to retreat Garibaldi sent a message to the Triumvirate saying that all was lost, that further resistance was impossible [1849. 7.3.] On July the 3rd, Garibaldi having assembled the troops and volunteers in the Square of St. Peter's, addressed them as follows: — ' Soldiers ! that which I have to offer you is this; hunger, thirst, cold, heat; no pay, no barracks, no rations, but frequent alarms, forced inarches, charges at the point of the bayonet. Whoever loves our country and glory may follow me.' Nearly 4,000 men did answer this appeal, and consented to follow Garibaldi in this move. Without a moment's delay this brave band left Rome on the road to Tivoli with the intention of entering the mountainous districts of Tuscany. And thus the curtain fell on the famous siege of Rome, and our hero was again a wanderer on the face of the earth, with his faithful Anita by his side to bear with him the burden and heat of the day, for Anita Garibaldi had some months ere this joined her husband, preferring death and danger by his side to domestic misery at Nice.» (Bent, 1882, p.75-77)

Wandering of Garibaldi: « No sooner was it known that Garibaldi had withdrawn than, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon of that very 3rd of July, the cross-keyed banners of St. Peter once more floated from the castle of St. Angelo, and Rome was again under the rule of its Pope. This defence of Rome, and the war going on at the same time in Venice, hopeless as they were from a military point of view, had, however, done something for Italy: they had made Italians proud of their country. The servant now of no State, a lawless adventurer in the eyes of national law, nothing but the brave leader of a few brave men, Garibaldi started on his adventurous way through and across Central Italy, where all force that was not French was now Austrian. ... escape across the Apennines from Tivoli to Terni, from Terni to Arezzo, from Arezzo to the Republic of San Marino. Meanwhile the Austrians from the side of Rimini threatened San Marino as conniving at Garibaldi's escape. So with great haste the Secretary of State went to intercede for a capitulation in favour of the volunteers, and for their own safety. Whilst the Republic of San Marino was asleep he contrived to effect his escape unobserved with Anita and a few followers, leaving the following laconic note on his bedroom table: ' The conditions imposed on me by the Austrians I cannot accept; and therefore we cease to encumber your territory.— Garibaldi.' In vain had Garibaldi tried to persuade Anita to remain behind at San Marino. Though worn out with fatigue and sickness she refused, and smilingly asked her husband "if he wished to abandon her;' so onward she toiled with him to the shores of the Adriatic.» (Bent, id., p.77-83)

In the profound sea a legate of Vlisbonne Shall destroy seventy lives behind rocks: « On reaching the port of Cesenatico [to the south of Ravenna], thanks to some fishermen, who braved the anger of the Austrians by lending them thirteen boats, they were able to embark for Venice; but a northern cloud had spread itself over the Adriatic that night, the sea was furious, and labouring with all their might they could not succeed in getting out of the port until daybreak, when the Austrians were just entering the town. Sails were now spread, for the wind had become favourable, and on the following morning four of the craft which contained Garibaldi and his immediate followers reached the mouth of the Po; in one was the General, Anita, Ciceruacchio the orator of Roman fame, his two sons, Ugo Bassi, and another. Anita, who had suffered fearfully during the voyage, was borne ashore in a dying state in the arms of her husband. The occupants of the remaining nine barges had not been so fortunate; the Austrians had discovered them by the light of a full moon, and had rained bullets and grape shot upon them, until they were forced to surrender.» (Bent, id., p.83)

Ravenna that shall murder the lady: « The shore where the four boats had just put in was swarming with the enemy's scouts sent to trace the fugitives. Anita was lying a little way off the shore concealed in a cornfield, her head resting on her husband's knee, whilst Leggiero, an inhabitant of La Maddalena, and a comrade of the General in South America, was their only companion; he kept guard for them, so as to give notice if he saw any white-coaled Austrians lurking near; Garibaldi, stricken with grief, watched the gradual ebbing away of that life whose every hope and joy had been so strongly bound up in his own. After landing at Mesoli, Garibaldi, his wife, Ugo Bassi and Ciceruacchio wandered about for some time when Ugo Bassi exclaimed, ' I have red pantaloons on (a pair which he had received from a soldier, his own having been worn out), and I may betray you, I will go a little way and change them.' After this Ugo Basssi was seen by the Austrians and captured; Ciceruacchio also and the nine others were not long undiscovered. The Austrians lost no time in condemning the nine to death immediately, reserving the two more conspicuous heroes for their fate in Bologna. Meanwhile we have left Anita dying in the cornfield, trembling in her agonies to think of the fate that might await her husband if captured. Later on in the day, when the Austrians had gone, some peasants, struck by the piteous sight of Garibaldi bearing his sinking wife in his arms, yielded to his entreaties to fetch medical aid from Ravenna; they brought a cart on which the dying woman was placed, and, conducted over rough byroads in this rickety conveyance, obliged to hide in rocks, and forests, for the Austrians were in pursuit. Garibaldi now carried Anita to the nearest cottage, where a bed was hastily prepared, and no sooner had she been placed thereon, than she expired leaning on Garibaldi's arm.» (Bent, id., p.83-85)

« Garibaldi and his friend Leggiero reached Ravenna in safety, where they lay concealed for some days in the house of a friend, and learning that it would be useless to proceed to Venice, now in the last gasp of her struggle, he wrote to a friend in Florence to inquire if there was any chance of a revolution in that city, friend sent word how best he could travel into Tuscany, pointing out the spots by the way where he would be likely to obtain food and a night's shelter from trusted adherents to the cause. Thus fortified with new hopes, the two pilgrims set out once more on their journeys, often taking food in wayside inns by the side of Croat scouts.» (Bent, id., p.86)

Discussion:
J.Ch. de Fontbrune (1980, p.314-315) recognizes in this quatrain the theme of «Liberation of the Corsica in September 1943», etc. But his identification of "the port of Corsibonne" as «the port of Bonifacio in Corsica» is grammatically invalid, because the port of Corsibonne is said to be Near Ravenna, and easily refuted by the historical fact. He says that the word "Corsibonne" is «coined by Nostradamus out of the words Corse and Bonifacio by necessity of rhyme». But we find the name of a real town near Ravenna "Corsibonne" in the guide book of the 16th century by Estienne: Les Voyages de plusieurs endroits de France et encores de la Terre Saincte, d'Espaigne, d'Italie et autres pays. Les Fleuves du Royaume) [See B. Arsenal, Res 8 - H 5169 (2)].

One of the empirical positivists about the possibility of prophecy reports the result of his positive reseaches concerning Corsibonne: « Corsibonne est bien une ville signalée dans les Voyages d'Estienne, non loin de Ravenne. Il ne s'agit nullement d'une invention du rédacteur des Centuries. [Corsibonne is certainly a town marked in the Travels of Estienne, not far from Ravenna. It concerns nothing of an invention by the author of the Centuries.]» (Espace Nostradamus, ANALYSE 144 Evaluation de la clef géographique des Centuries by Jacques Halbronn: http://ramkat.free.fr/nhalb99.html#ref21, 2005).

Leoni, also positivist and sceptic, used to research to the end of the chapter may have confirmed positively and historically the fact when he noted: "The port of Corsibonne: The port of Ravenna" (Leoni, 1982(1961), p.396).
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© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2012. All rights reserved.
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Koji Nihei Daijyo

Author:Koji Nihei Daijyo
We have covered 143 quatrains (§588-§730) concerning the World Events in the 19th century after Napoleonic ages [1821-1900] in the Prophecies of Nostradamus, and 219 in the 20th [1901-2000] (§731-§949).

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