§641. Crimean war

19th century:
§641. Crimean war (1853-1856): VIII-83.

VIII-83:
The greatest fleet outside the port of Zara,
Shall make its operations near Byzantium,
The enemy’s defeat & there shall be no friend of his.
A third by two shall largely pillage & take.


(Le plus grand voile hors du port de Zara,
Pres de Bisance fera son entreprinse,
D’ennemy perte & l’amy ne sera
Le tiers à deux fera grand pille & prinse.)

Keys to the reading:
Zara: In Dalmatia, belonging to Austrian Empire: 1815-1920;

Outside the port of Zara: Excepting the fleet of Austria in neutrality;

A third: One of the three principal allies, namely, England, France or Turkey;

à: = par (by), indicating a unit of a kind (Suzuki, Ibuki);

A third by two: Two of a third, i.e., England and France.

Summary:
The greatest fleet outside the port of Zara, Shall make its operations near Byzantium, The enemy’s defeat & there shall be no friend of his: A third by two shall largely pillage & take: «According to the czar, Turkey had a choice between two things only: she must regard Prussia as either her greatest friend or her greatest enemy. To remind her of this, Nicholas sent Prince Menshikov, one of his ministers and confidants, to Constantinople. Arriving February 28th, 1853, Menshikov exhibited a haughty and irritable demeanour; and, after astonishing the Divan by his noisy opposition, put forward pretensions amounted to nothing less than the restoration to the czar of the protectorate over all the sultan's subjects professing the Greco-Russian worship — that is to say the great majority of the inhabitants of Turkey in Europe. In vain the Divan protested; in vain the friendly powers interceded. Unable to obtain the satisfaction he was demanding with the extreme of violence, the Russian ambassador extraordinary quitted the Bosporous with menace on his lips. And, in effect, on the 2nd of July, the czar's troops crossed the Pruth to occupy, contrary to all treaty stipulations, the two Danubian principalities. Nicholas was not prepared for war and did not expect to be obliged to have recourse to that last appeal; he hoped to triumph over the Divan by audacity. Moreover, he did not think the western powers were in a position to come to an understanding and to act in common. He was mistaken: Turkey's death struggle did not prevent her from making a supreme effort to sell her life dearly, if it were impossible for her to save it; and on the 26th of September the sultan declared war on the aggressor. Hostilities began in the course of the month of October, first on the Danube and afterwards in Asia, where a surprise made the Turks masters of the little maritime fort of St. Nicholas or Chefketil. The Porte was not long abandoned to its own resources, for the time of political torpor in regard to the territorial aggrandisement of the Muscovite colossus had gone by; the eyes of all were at last opened and a European crisis was inevitable. At that moment, the fleets of France and England were already at the entrance of the Dardanelles; and even before the end of October these fine naval armies passed the straits under the authority of a firman, and approached Constantinople. Thus, by an almost miraculous concourse of circumstances, an alliance was formed between France and England, those two ancient and ardent rivals. Preceded by a formal alliance with the Porte (March 12th), it was signed in London, April l0th, 1854. This was not all: this memorable document was immediately submitted to the governments of Austria and Prussia and sanctioned by a protocol signed at Vienna by the four powers, by which the justice of the cause sustained by those of the west was solemnly proclaimed. Austria and Prussia laid down the conditions of their eventual participation in the war in another treaty, that of Berlin, of the 20th of April, 1854, to which the Germanic Confederation on its side gave its adhesion. Finally at Baïadji-Keui, on the 14th of June, 1854, the great Danubian power also concluded a treaty with the Ottoman Porte, in virtue of which she was authorised to enter into military occupation of the principalities, whether she should have previously expelled the Russian army or whether the latter should of its own will have decided to evacuate them. Russia was in the most complete isolation; the Scandinavian states, who had hitherto been her allies, declared themselves neutral; an insurrection in her favour, which was preparing in Servia was prevented; that of the Greeks, openly favoured by King Otto, was stifled. The Turks, thus effectively protected, were able to turn ful their forces on the frontiers, and to prove by heroic acts that they had not lost all the bravery of their ancestors. In return for Europe's efforts in favour of the integrity of his empire, and in order to ward off the reproach they might incur by supporting the cause of the crescent against a Christian state, the sultan as early as the 6th of June, 1854, published an edict or irade, by which he improved in a notable manner the condition of the rayas, and prepared for their civil freedom, as well as for a complete remodelling of the laws which, governing up to that day the internal government of the Ottoman Empire, seemed to render its preservation almost impossible.

Thus that movement of expansion to which Russia had been impelled during four centuries, and which by conquest after conquest, due either to diplomacy or the sword, had made Russian power the bugbear of Europe, finds itself suddenly arrested. ''Republican or Cossack,'' was the famous prognostic of Napoleon. The immense superiority of the marines belonging to the allies made it possible to attack Russia on every sea. They bombarded the military port of Odessa on the Black Sea (April 22nd, 1854), but respected the city and the commercial port; the Russian establishments in the Caucasus had been burned by the Russians themselves. They blockaded Kronstadt on the Baltic, landed on the islands of Åland, and took the fortress of Bomarsund (August 16th, 1854).» (HH, XVII, p.561-563)

« The emperor Napoleon gave the first signal of resistance by boldly sending the French Mediterranean fleet to Salamis to have it within reach of Constantinople and the Black Sea. He won over England, at first hesitating, to his alliance, and assured himself of the neutrality of Austria and Prussia. Hostilities opened with the destruction by the Russians of a Turkish flotilla at Sinope. The Anglo-French fleet entered the Black Sea, whilst an army despatcned from the ports of Great Britain and France assembled under the walls of Constantinople. The 14th of September, 1854, the army of the allies, seventy thousand strong, debarked on the Crimean coasts, and the victory of Alma allowed the commencement of the siege of Sebastopol, a formidable fortress whose annihilation was necessary in order to protect Constantinople against a sudden attack. This siege, one of the most terrible in the annals of modern history, lasted for more than a year. Generals Canrobert and Pélissier successively commanded the French troops. Continual fighting, two victories, those of Inkerman and the Tchernaya, earned for the French soldiers less glory than their dauttless courage against a terrible climate and an enemy who ceaselessly renewed his ranks. At last, on the 8th of September, 1855, after miracles of constancy, French dash and English solidity had their reward. The tower of the Malakoff was carried and the town taken. The emperor Nicholas had died a few months before. In the Baltic the Anglo-French fleet had destroyed Bomarsund, the advanced bulwark of Russia against Sweden, and in the Black Sea the French iron-plated gunboats, now used for the first time, had compelled the fortress of Kinburn to surrender, thus opening southern Russia. An allied squadron had even taken Petropavlovsk on the Pacific Ocean. Finally French diplomacy had induced the king of Sweden and the king of Sardinia to enter the league against Russia, and was perhaps on the point of winning over the emperor of Austria. The czar Alexander II, successor of Nicholas, demanded peace; it was concluded at Paris, March 30th, 1856, under the eyes of the emperor of the French.» (HH, XIII, p.129-130)

Discussion:
Larmor (1925, p.248) first pointed out the theme of this quatrain concerning the Crimean war, but he mixed it with that of the unification of Italy in vain.
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§ 642. Count Cavour allied with Napoleon III

19th century:
§642. Count Cavour allied with Napoleon III (1855-1860): VII-20.

VII-20:
Ambassadors of the Tuscan tongue,
In April & May the Alps & the sea to pass:
That of calf shall expose his harangue,
Going ahead not to efface the Gallic life.


(Ambassadeurs de la Tosquane langue,
Avril & May Alpes & mer passer:
Celuy de veau expousera l’harangue,
Vie Gauloise ne venant effacer.)

Keys to the reading:
That of calf: That of Turin (Torino), Taurasia (Torino) connoting Taurus (bœuf, ox) according to a popular etymology, therefore «veau, calf» (cf. Vignois, 1910, p.242), although the true etymology of Tauros is mont (mount), colline (hill) (Brunot & Bruneau). That of Turin signifies Count Cavour (1810-1861), the prime minister (1852-1860) of the kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia, whose capital was Turin. The expression «veau, calf» signifies the kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia as a prefiguration of Unified Italy;

Vie Gauloise ne venant effacer: The construction as follows: [France] venant n'effacer vie Gauloise ([France] going ahead not to efface the Gallic life).

Summary:
Ambassadors of the Tuscan tongue: « The dream of unifying Italy, which also Cavour was pursuing openly, was not to be realized, he understood well, by his country alone. It needed international aids, which he obtained from France. He knew well Napoleon III’s affection for Italy and his desire to play an important role on the international theatre. Cavour worked sagaciously to afford a chance to Napoleon III for this sake. He supported, in 1855, Napoleon III who had waged war against Russia in order to pledge for France, and sent twenty-one thousand Piedmontese to the Crimean front. In exchange for it he expected to get French support in order to occupy Austrian territories in Italy. Cavour augmented the number of ambassadors to be dispatched to Napoleon III, who became less reluctant to be troubled with the difficult problems between Austria and Italy. On July 28th, 1858, he met Napoleon III at Plombières in Vosges.» (Trémolières III, p.178).

«Gavour was advancing to his goal with an unheard-of persistency, preparing fleets, armies, finances, alliances, lancing against Austria the collection of the letters of Joseph de Maistre, in which the empire of the Habsburgs is treated as the enemy of the human race, making every effort to conciliate France, even to obtaining the vote, after the Orsini crime, of a disgraceful law against refugees. In July, 1858, he had that famous interview with Napoleon III at Plombières in which war was decided on, and on the 1st of January, 1859, at a New Year's reception, the emperor said to Baron von Hübner, the ambassador of Austria: "I regret that our relations with your government are not so good as they were. I beg you to tell the emperor that my personal sentiments for him are unchanged.''» (HH, XV, p.15)

« That war between Sardinia and Austria was merely a question of time became apparent to everyone toward the end of the fifties. Fortunately for Sardinia, Austria's position was an isolated one owing to the enmity which her attitude during the Crimean War had won for her from Russia, and her inborn jealousy and distrust of Prussia. It was not long before Russian men-of-war were to be seen in the Mediterranean, and Napoleon's efforts on behalf of France were no less successful. The cautious emperor Napoleon might not have been so ready to champion the weaker side had it not been for the attempt on his life made by Orsini. The emperor had once held close relations with the Italian patriots, had even been a member of an Italian secret society, and now, regarded by his former associates as a traitor to their cause, he was condemned by them to death. In February a letter written by Orsini was made public in which he adjured the emperor to restore to Italy the independence; to free it forever from the Austrian yoke. “ Without Italian independence, ” the letter closed, “ the peace of Europe, even your majesty's own safety is but an empty dream. Free my unhappy fatherland and the blessings of twenty-five million people will follow you into the next world. ” On the 13th of March Orsini and Fieri perished on the scaffold, the two remaining accomplices having been deported to America. The courage with which Orsini met death, and the love of country he manifested up to his last breath aroused universal sympathy. What Orsini living had failed to bring about, he accomplished dead. While the murderous attempt was made the pretext for robbing France of all freedom by means of the security law of the 28th of January, Napoleon in conjunction with Cavour — who with artful smoothness calmed his imperial associate's anger toward Italy, the hotbed of conspiracies — proceeded to carry out the wishes of Orsini. Several weeks later Cavour held a secret conference with Napoleon at which plans regarding Italy were perfected. “ Italy to be free as far as Adria; the whole of upper Italy to be united in a kingdom, France to be enlarged by the annexation of Savoy,” these were the terms agreed upon in the interview. It was further proposed that the bond between the two reigning houses should be made still firmer by the betrothal of Prince Napoleon Bonaparte with Clotilde, the daughter of Victor Emmanuel.» (HH, IX, p.603)

In April & May the Alps & the sea to pass: « In 1859 war was brought close in sight by Victor Emmanuel’s announcement at the opening of the chamber of deputies in Turin that Sardinia could no longer remain insensible to the cries for help that were arising on all sides. Austria proceeded at once to strengthen her army, to place the whole of Lombardy under martial law, and by every means possible sought to secure her power and possessions in Italy. Austria was severely blamed by the neutral powers for beginning hostilities, and it seemed as though with the death of Field Marshal Radetzky Austria's military star had set forever. To Franz Gyulay, a member of the Hungarian nobility who had filled many offices but had in none of them given proofs of marked ability,fell the command. By shameful inactivity the Austrians allowed the Sardinians time to concentrate their 80,000 men around the fortress of Alessandria, where they were joined in May by several divisions of French troops, Garibaldi, meanwhile, with his “ Alpine hunters ” guarding the foot of the mountain whence he could harass the right wing of the Austrians and support the operations of the main army. The popularity of his name drew volunteers in flocks, and his appearance in the northern lake-region aroused the wildest enthusiasm among the people. About the middle of May Napoleon himself arrived in Italy; although he left the actual lead to experienced generals, he took his place at the head of the troops.» (HH, IX, p.603-604).

« Napoleon's New Year's greeting was immediately appreciated at its right value by the military party in Vienna, whilst the Austrian diplomacy remained on the wrong track till almost the last moment.On the 20th of April Cavour received news through Naples that the ultimatum dated the 19th, which was to give him breathing time, was on its way from Vienna. On the 23d Baron Kellersperz handed it in at Turin; it contained the peremptory interpellation: “ Will Piedmont, within the space of three days, promise to place its army on the footing of peace and dismiss the volunteer corps? — yes or no.” With this declaration of war, Austria had burned her boats; it now remained only to let the action follow the threat, as thunder follows lightning. The Piedmontese army should have been scattered, before a Frenchman put his foot on Italian soil; the French corps could then have been annihilated as they landed in troops or came down through the mountain passes. Instead of this, Gyulai let three days beyond the term assigned to Piedmont elapse before, on the 29th of April, he crossed the Ticino. Meanwhile the first French soldiers came into Turin [by land] and Genoa [by sea] (cf. Duby, p.169), but only in quite small divisions.» (HH, XV, p.15-17)

That of calf shall expose his harangue: « At the sitting of the Congress at Paris, on the 8th of April, Walewski, the French minister of foreign affairs, suddenly called attention to the situation of the States of the Church and of the kingdom of Naples, and to the dangers attendant on the occupation of a great part of Italy by the Austrian armies. The plenipotentiaries of Austria, Buol-Schauenstein and Hübner, declared that they had no answer to make on these subjects, which were foreign to the congress. Cavour asked to be heard, and drew a very striking picture of the occupation of the Roman states by Austria, an occupation which had endured for the last seven years. “ The presence of the Austrian troops in the legations and in the duchy of Parma, ” he added, “ destroys the political equilibrium in Italy and constitutes a veritable danger for Sardinia. It is our duty to point out to Europe the existence of a state of things so abnormal as that which results in the indefinite occupation by Austria of a great part of Italy.”' Baron von Hübner made a vehement reply. The Russian plenipotentiary, Count Orloff, could but rejoice to see ungrateful Austria called to account in her turn. This was only an exchange of ideas, but the Italian question had been brought forward and Cavour could write to one of his friends, “ In three years we shall have war.” We may pass rapidly over the years 1857 and 1858, which saw the organisation of the Danubian principalities into an administrcitive union, the signing of the convention for the free navigation of the Danube, and the death of old Radetzky, who was replaced by the archduke Maximilian (January 5th, 1858). These two years were, properly speaking, a preparation for the war of Italy, a diplomatic struggle with Piedmont preceding the armed struggle. Europe felt a presentiment of it. After the Crimean War, France had approached sensibly nearer to Russia, who was herself drawing Prussia into her orbit, and in all the conferences of these two years we constantly see Russia, France, and Prussia voting against Austria and England. The Stuttgart interview between Napoleon III and Alexander II in 1857 still further accentuated this situation.» (HH, XV, p.14-15)

Going ahead not to efface the Gallic life: « Napoleon III said, on May 2nd, 1859, when he started for Italy, “ France has not abdicated her role of civilizer: her natural allies have been always those that want the amelioration of the humanity... We are going to this classic land, illustrated with so many victories, to rediscover there the traces of our fathers. May God permit us to be worthy of them ! ”.» (Vignois, id., p.242). «A French army reappeared on that soil where three centuries before the arms of France had left so many glorious traces.» (HH, XIII, p.136)

Discussion::
Though Vignois (1910, p.242) first pointed out the theme of this quatrain, his reading of the verses is not always convincing. He translated the verses 1-2 as follows: «An ambassador of the Italian tongue shall pass beyond the Alps and the sea during the months of April and May.» He identified “an ambassador” as Count Cavour, but the text of Nostradamus puts it in the plural: Ambassadors. And he said that Cavour went to the congress of Paris during April and May, 1856. What inexactitude ! The congress of Paris in 1856 lasted only in February, March and April (cf. Seignobos, 1921b, p.320-323). The month of May of the year disinterested itself from the congress. And how did he pass “the sea” in traveling to Paris via the Alps ?

It seems that the only possible subject of the verb “to pass” is “ambassadors”, but it is only an appearance ! Nostradamus knows how to use verbs to express certain events without any explicit grammatical subject. He plays “hide-and-seek” with his readers as to some of his prophetic quatrains. In the context of this quatrain, it is French army that shall pass the Alps and the sea in April and May, 1859, though in April the event is only in preparation. In the same manner, the most natural and logical subject of the verb “going ahead” “France or French army” is eluded in the verse 4.

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§ 643. Baptism of the Prince Imperial

19th century:
§643. Baptism of the Prince Imperial (1856.6.14): X-8.

X-8:
The Count of Senegalia shall combine
His index and thumb with the forehead of his own son,
The Myr. armed by several of the first rank.
Three persons in seven days dead wounded.


(Index & poulse parfondra le front
De Senegalia le Conte à son filz propre
La Myr. armee par plusieurs de prinfront
Trois dans sept jours blesses mors.)

Keys to the reading:
Le Conte de Senegalia: = The count of Senigallia = the pope Pius IX (Vignois, 1910, p.242);

Parfondre: Fondre (to combine) (Godefroy);

The Count of Senegalia shall combine His index and thumb with the forehead of his own son: «Now, the Prince Imperial was baptized (the traditional gesture is with thumb and index finger joined) by Cardinal Patrizzi, as proxy for Pius IX whose godson the baby was.» (Laver, 1942, p.204);

Myr.: Abbreviation of myron in Greek, μυρον, liquid perfume (Bailly). La Myr. is an eulogistic proper name for a supposed lady from the Greek neuter μυρον;

Armee: = Adj. Armé, Garni, pourvu (garnished, provided) (Petit Robert);

De prinfront: «De premier rang» (of the first rank) (Vignois, id.). Prinfront = prin, adj. premier (first) (Godefroy) + front (front);

The Myr. armed by several of the first rank: Several persons of the first rank at the ceremony are from top to bottom garnished with liquid perfume;

Trois: Napoleon III, the Prince Imperial and Pius IX;

Dans sept jours: = dans sept ans (in seven years) as in V-18 (§214) where the seventh day means the seventh year in corresponding to seven years of VII-15 (§212);

Blesse: = Blessé, Adj. Fig. «Blessé dans son amour-propre» (wounded in his pride) (Petit Robert).

Summary:
The Count of Senegalia shall combine His index and thumb with the forehead of his own son, The Myr. armed by several of the first rank: « On March 16th [1856], the Empress gives birth to the Prince Imperial: the Pope agrees to be his godfather; the baptism, where he is represented by a legate, is the occasion of a great festival (June 14th)» (Seignobos, 1921a, p.251)

Three persons in seven months dead wounded:
1° Napoleon III died in exile in England on January 9th, 1873, after having suffered a fatal defeat in 1870, confronted with Prussia.

2° Pius IX died on February 7th, 1878, in rupture with the kingdom of Italy that had deprived him of Rome in 1870.

3° The Prince Imperial: « In the war of Zululand, the Prince Imperial was reconnoitering on the first of June, 1879, with a small number of British soldiers, with Lieutenant Carey. During a break, while the horsemen had dismounted, the Zulu hidden in tall grass suddenly attacked them with their assegais: amidst the bustle of soldiers eager to escape, the Prince was wounded by a shot of an arrow which prevented him from following his companions and avoid traits that gave him death.» (Vignois, id.)

Thus, seven years passed from 1873 [the first] to 1879 [the last] according to French manner of calendric computation.
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§ 644. The attempt on the Emperor by Orsini

19th century:
§644. The attempt on the Emperor by Orsini (1858.1.14): V-8.

V-8:
Shall be released the live, mortal fire hidden,
Inside the globes horrible dread.
By night a city thrown into powder by a band,
The city on fire, the favourable enemy.


(Sera laissé le feu vif, mort caché,
Dedans les globes horrible espouventable
De nuict à classe cité en pouldre lasché,
La cité à feu, l’ennemy favorable.)

Keys to the reading:
Le feu vif, mort caché, dedans les globes: = Le feu vif, mortel caché dedans les globes (the live, mortal fire hidden inside the globes);

Espouventable: = espouvantable;

Shall be released the live, mortal fire hidden, Inside the globes horrible dread = The live, mortal fire hidden inside the globes shall be released horrible dread, as in “ What Orsini living had failed to bring about, he accomplished dead ”.

A city: Paris;

Classe: = a band, a group of persons;

Powder: = gunpowder.

Lasché: = laschée, because of the necessity of rhyming with caché, which is to modify le feu.

Summary:
Shall be released the live, mortal fire hidden inside the globes horrible dread. By night a city thrown into powder by a band, the city on fire: « The Legislature, elected in June 1857, convened in November only for credentials and extended until January 18th, 1858, had not yet met when occurred the accident that seems to have changed the direction of the policy of Napoleon III. On January 14th, at half past eight in the evening, when the Emperor arrived by car at the Opera (then located in Montpensier Street), three bombs were thrown by hand next to his car and he was not attained, but in the packed crowd over 150 people were injured, eight died. It was the first attack by a chemical explosive, produced an impression of horror and exasperation.» (Seignobos, 1921a, p.275)

« The evening of the 14th of January, 1858, at the moment of the arrival of the emperor and empress at the opera, three explosions were heard. The police arrested four Italians, three of them were but instruments; the fourth, Orsini, was remarquable. His father had perished in 1831 in the insurrection against the pope in which Napoleon III and his elder brother had taken part. The son since his childhood had taken part in all the national Italian conspiracies. A profound impression was made on the audience when Jules Favre, by permission of the emperor, read aloud a letter addressed to the latter by Orsini. The criminal did not ask mercy for himself; he asked freedom for his unhappy country. He did not go so far as to demand that the blood of Frenchmen should be shed for the Italians, but only that France should interdict the support of Austria by Germany. Orsini and his accomplices were condemned to death on the 26th of February. Orsini was executed on the 14th of March, with one of his accomplices.» (HH, XIII, p.132-133).

The favourable enemy: « That war between Sardinia and Austria was merely a question of time became apparent to everyone toward the end of the fifties. Fortunately for Sardinia, Austria's position was an isolated one owing to the enmity which her attitude during the Crimean War had won for her from Russia, and her inborn jealousy and distrust of Prussia. It was not long before Russian men-of-war were to be seen in the Mediterranean, and Napoleon's efforts on behalf of France were no less successful. The cautious emperor Napoleon might not have been so ready to champion the weaker side had it not been for the attempt on his life made by Orsini. The emperor had once held close relations with the Italian patriots, had even been a member of an Italian secret society, and now, regarded by his former associates as a traitor to their cause, he was condemned by them to death. In February a letter written by Orsini was made public in which he adjured the emperor to restore to Italy the independence; to free it forever from the Austrian yoke. “ Without Italian independence, ” the letter closed, “ the peace of Europe, even your majesty's own safety is but an empty dream. Free my unhappy fatherland and the blessings of twenty-five million people will follow you into the next world. ” On the 13th of March Orsini and Fieri perished on the scaffold, the two remaining accomplices having been deported to America. The courage with which Orsini met death, and the love of country he manifested up to his last breath aroused universal sympathy. What Orsini living had failed to bring about, he accomplished dead. While the murderous attempt was made the pretext for robbing France of all freedom by means of the security law of the 28th of January, Napoleon in conjunction with Cavour — who with artful smoothness calmed his imperial associate's anger toward Italy, the hotbed of conspiracies — proceeded to carry out the wishes of Orsini. Several weeks later Cavour held a secret conference with Napoleon at which plans regarding Italy were perfected. “ Italy to be free as far as Adria; the whole of upper Italy to be united in a kingdom, France to be enlarged by the annexation of Savoy,” these were the terms agreed upon in the interview.» (HH, IX, p.603)

Disccussion:
M. Dufresne (1995, p.82-83) proposed an interpretation of this quatrain which should be historically attested by the bombardment of the RAF [Royal Air Force] upon the city of Dresden on the night of February 13th, 1945. But, his is accompanied with an anachronism concerning the historical progress of fabrication of bombs.

The key word is “the globes”, which mean of course a spherical shape of bombs.

Now, the history of the development of bombs is resumed as follows: « A bomb is in general what is used in releasing from a plane. It is nearly streamlined in its outline and has wings on the tail in order that it is smoothly carried beneath the plane and falls steadily after release. The origin of bombs is said to be traced in the invention in the 19th century by a Russian chemist N. I. Kibal’chich with a view to assassination. In 1858, Felice Orsini of Italy became notorious when he projected the grenades he privately produced against the French Emperor Napoleon III. Modern bombs are first used in the Italiano-Turkish war (1911-1912), when Italy released from her planes in the beginning global bombs and afterwards ordinary cannonballs with wings. In the World War I, there appeared bombers and they made big bombs to be carried by planes.» (HDHJ, XI, p.1011)

Then, “the globes” should mean an old or primordial type of bombs, which are evidently out of date and of no use in the World War II.

And, in fact, the bomb confiscated after the crime in the hideout of one of the accomplices, apparently just semblable to those used by the accused, « consists in a hollow cylinder cast integral and brittle, composed of the two parts united by means of a pitch of screw wrought in the interior walls. It is 9.5 cm in height, 7.3 cm in diameter. The inside capacity is of 120 ml. Out of it has been extracted a little yellowish, fine, crystalline and heavy substance, which has proved to be pure mercury fulminate with no mixture. The extracted quantity of the substance forming the charge of the projectile was 130 g, occupying 84 ml, namely more than two thirds of the inside capacity.» « Each machine consisted in a sort of matallic pear, hollow, with very thick interior walls, a litte elongated. And they say that the bomb was disguised in a piece of taffeta.» (Torné-Chavigny, 1860, p.46-47)

Therefore, this quatrain cannot be referred to the event of the 20th century, but to that of the times when the bombs were on their openig stage of development.

As to the case of Orsini, cf. §633(VIII-43), §634(IV-65), §645(V-9), §646(V-10).
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Koji Nihei Daijyo

Author:Koji Nihei Daijyo
We have covered 143 quatrains (§588-§730) concerning the World Events in the 19th century after Napoleonic ages [1821-1900] in the Prophecies of Nostradamus, and 219 in the 20th [1901-2000] (§731-§949).

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