§687

19th century:

§687 German siege of Paris; Italian unification of Rome (1870): V-30.


V-30:

All around the grand city,

Soldiers shall lodge in fields and towns:

They shall make assaults upon Paris, Rome provoked,

Upon the Pontiff then shall be made a grand pillage.

 

(Tout à l'entour de la grande cité,

Seront soldartz logés par champs & ville:

Donner l'assault Paris, Rome incité

Sur le pont lors sera faicte grand pille.) 

 

NOTES. All around the grand city, Soldiers shall lodge in fields and towns: “ Preparations were hardly completed when the enemy arrived. On the heights of Châtillon, which was a valuable position for Paris, the Germans found no opposition except from some troops who were already demoralised, being, so to speak, composed of the tail-end of defeated regiments. A panic ensued and the Germans gained possession of the heights, which enabled them to bombard Paris.” (HH, XIII, p.163). “ On the very evening of the 19th [of September, 1870], the two German armies came into contact with each other and achieved the besiegement of Paris.” (Seignobos, 1921b, p.255). Cf: Between the two streams shall enclose him the military hand (§689, VI-33).

They shall make assaults upon Paris: “At last bombardment brought the siege to an end. The Prussians launched enormous shells, larger than any that had yet been known, into the town, on to the monuments which are the pride of civilisation, on to the hospitals, on to the schools where sometimes the dead bodies of five or six children would be found. They fell, not on the ramparts, but in Paris. All through the night these huge masses of metal, whose fall meant death and destruction, were heard whizzing through the air. But the whole town only became the more enthusiastic, everyone was eager to fight, and not an angry word was heard, unless anyone spoke of surrender.” (HH, XIII, p.165). On the other hand, Paris  made scarcely any true assault on the enemy (cf. id.).

Le pont: = Pontife (Pontiff). Cf. le pont, le Pont (§777, VII-24); pontife (775, III-65).

Rome provoked, Upon the Pontiff then shall be made a grand pillage: « In vain had Victor Emmanuel sent his envoy to Rome with an autograph letter in which he appealed to the heart of the pope “ with the affection of a son, the loyalty of a king, and the soul of an Italian,” that he would permit the royal troops, already posted in the outskirts of Rome, to enter and occupy such positions in the Roman territory as was necessary for the maintenance of order and the safe-guarding of the pontiff. Pius IX held firmly to his refusal, saying he would yield to force but not to injustice. Then it was necessary to resort to force. The government gave orders to General Raffaele Cadorna to pass the borders with his troops, at the same time informing the European governments, by means of a circular letter, of the resolution taken and justifying its action by pointing out the impossibility of reconciling Italy with papal Rome and the necessity of procuring peace and security for Italy. The note then reassured the powers as to the steps Italy would take for the safeguard of the pope's spiritual power so that his liberty and independence might be complete. On September 11th [1870] Cadorna entered the pontifical territories. On the 17th the Italian soldiers were at Civitavecchia, and on the 19th under the walls of Rome.» (HH, IX, p.621-622)

« But Pius IX had determined on his course of conduct and was resolved to pursue it at any cost. His views were expressed in his letter written September 19th to General Kanzler, the commander-in-chief of the papal force. In it Pius IX ordered Kanzler to treat with the enemy on the slightest breach of the walls of Rome “ as the defence was solely to be suffcient to serve as proof of an act of violence and nothing more.” And so it happened; at half-past five on the morning of September 21st the Italian soldiers opened fire between the Pia and the Sorlara gates and at the gate of St. John and St. Pancras, and hardly was a breach made when the papal troops ceased fire and hoisted the white flag on all the batteries. A messenger was sent to Cadorna and it was speedily agreed that Rome should surrender all but the Leonine city, whicn should for the present remain under the jurisdiction of the pope. Then the papal troops were awarded the honours of war, but were obliged to lay down arms and flags. The peasant soldiers were sent back to their homes and all foreigners despatched to their respective countries at the expense of the Italian government. » (HH, IX, p.622) 

«The taking possession of Rome by King Victor Emmanuel and the voluntary retirement of Pius IX to the Vatican closes the revolutionary era to which these two personages have given their names. It had led on the one hand to the constitutional unity of Italy, and on the other to the suppression of the states of the church, — the last vestige of ecclesiastical immunities of the Middle Ages to the exclusively spiritual constitution of the sovereign pontiff of universal Catholicism, — two of the most important changes accomplished in the history of politics and European civilisation.» (HH, IX, p.623)

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§688

19th century:

§688 Gambetta’s defeat; Garibaldi’s relief (1870-1871): III-69.


III-69:

Grand troops conducted by a youth,

Sall be fallen in the hands of the enemies:

But the aged man born to the half hog,

Shall make Chalon and Mascon be friends.

 

(Grand exercite conduit par jouvenceau,

Se viendra rendre aux mains des ennemis:

Mais le viellard nay au demi pourceau,

Fera Chalon & Mascon estre amis.) 

 

NOTES: Exercite: Lat. « exercitus, army, corps of troops.» (Vignois, 1910, p.310).

Jouvenceau: Lat. « juventus, of age capable of serving the country. Léon Gambetta, born on April 2nd, 1838,  Minister of War in 1870, was then aged less than 32.» (Vignois, 1910, p.310).

Grand troops conducted by a youth, Sall be fallen in the hands of the enemies: “ Gambetta, who considered more the quantity of the troops than their quality, was very hopeful, particularly as a simultaneous sortie out of Paris was planned for November 30th and December 1st. He continually urged General Aurelle to begin offensive operations. But neither the attacks on the right wing of the German army at Ladon on the 24th, at Beaune-la-Rolande on the 28th of November, nor those on the right wing near Lagny and Poupry on December 2nd were of any avail. On December 3rd Prince Frederick Charles assumed the offensive, and repulsed the enemy in a sweeping assault; continuing the fight on the 4th, he stormed the railroad station as well as the suburbs of Orleans, and at ten o'clock in the evening the grand duke [of Mecklenburg] entered the city, which had been evacuated by the French. The Germans gained more than twelve thousand prisoners of war, sixty cannon, and four gun-boats. The enemy's line of retreat was along the Loire, partly up and partly down the stream. Gambetta, who was dissatisfied with the way General Aurelle had managed affairs, removed him from command and divided the army of the Loire into two parts, which were to operate separately or in conjunction, according to circumstances. The first army of the Loire, consisting of three corps, was stationed at Nevers, and was commanded by General Bourbaki; the second, of three and one-half corps, at Blois, commanded by General Chanzy…. On January 23rd the road to Lyons was occupied, the first skirmishes began; the 2nd and 7th corps crowded in from the south and west, that of General Werder from the north. No way remained open but to the east. Bourbaki tried to commit suicide on the 26th of January. At the same time a telegram from Gambetta arrived, superseding Bourbaki and putting General Clinchant in his place as commander-in-chief of the army of the east. But he was no less unable to realise Gambetta's project of marching the army southward, and was obliged to retreat to Pontarlier. He hoped to make use of the news of the truce of Versailles as a sheet anchor; but it was soon evident that it did not apply to the seat of war in the east. Thus the catastrophe could not be averted…  After the annihilation of all the armies of relief, Paris had nothing more to hope for, unless the grounds for hope were in the city itself.” (HH, XIII, p.167-171).

The amateur strategy of the Delegated Minister of War, M. Gambetta, who controlled the military operations after the fall of Metz, is shown by accumulated proofs to have been the principal cause of the failure to relieve Paris, and consequently of the final catastrophe. The failure of moral in these armies, though important as a secondary cause of the continued disasters along the line of the Loire, is reduced to its proper proportions as a consequence of the War Minister’s headstrong policy.” (Rich, I, Preface).

Viellard: = Vieillard, de « vielle, vieillece, sf.: vieillesse(Daele).

The aged man born to the half hog: = Giuseppe Garibaldi in France in 1870 was aged over 60, born in 1807, and he was naturally and since his childhood accustomed to a savage way of living, most frequently in the open air, lack of necessities and conveniences (cf. Bent, 1882, pp.21-24, 54-55, 77-80), which induces the Prophet to call him “a half hog”. On the other hand, he is also called “ a man by half (le mihom)” (§669, VIII-44). Le mihom: The half-human representing an atheistic revolutionary Garibaldi, who is denounced by Nostradamus, Catholic apologist, in terms of severity: « le pourceau demy-homme, the half-human hog » (§689,I-64), « le viellard nay au demi pourceau, the old man born to the half-hog» (§688, III-69), « monstre vapin, rascal monster» (§665,V-20) etc.;

“ These three quatrains [VIII-44, I-64 and III-69] are adapted to each other: the « pourceau demy-homme » of the second is the « myhom » of the first and the « demy pourceau » of the third. The Centaur was half a human, half a horse; the Siren, half a woman, half a fish. Here, a human is by half a hog.” (Torné-Chavigny, 1870, p.204).

But the aged man born to the half hog, Shall make Chalon and Mascon be friends: This means that the general volunteer was of a little merite in his battle of field in France, near Chalon-sur-Saône and Mâcon, namely not so completely defeated as to be disgusted by the French people: “ Garibaldi, affected by the republican chimera, arrived in Tours on October 9th, having been appointed commander-in-chief of the Volunteers of the Vosges by Gambetta. He advanced with an army of twenty thousand men from Autun and was beaten back on November 26th and 27th at Pasques… General Manteuffel, who had taken command of the army of the south on January 12th, was approaching by forced marches. He marched through the mountain chains of the Côte d'Or, thence between the fortresses of Langres and Dijon, without molestation from Garibaldi, who had occupied Dijon with 25,000 men after Werder's evacuation. On the news of Bourbaki's retreat he turned towards the southeast with his two corps, 44,950 infantry, 2,866 cavalry and 168 guns in all, in order to block the way of the enemy towards Lyons. He wished to force the enemy to choose between a battle by his demoralised troops, a surrender without battle, or a crossing of the Swiss frontier. On January 23rd the road to Lyons was occupied, the first skirmishes began; the 2nd and 7th corps crowded in from the south and west, that of General Werder from the nortn. No way remained open but to the east. Bourbaki tried to commit suicide on the 26th of January… Garibaldi meanwhile had been held in check by 6,000 men under General Kettler, during which battle the enemy found a German flag under a heap of corpses. He evacuated Dijon on the night of February 1st on the report that stronger forces were approaching, withdraw southwards, and soon afterwards returned to the island of Caprera.”  (HH, XIII, p.169-171). “ - M. Victor Hugo: He [Garibaldi] is the only one that has not been vanquished of all the generals who fought for France.”  (Assemblée nationale (8 mars 1871), cité Torné-Chavigny, 1870 [28 mars 1871], p.208).

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§689

19th century:

§689 Garibaldi welcomed in France; Paris bombarded (1870-1871): I-64.



I-64:

At night the Sun they shall think to have seen

When the half human hog they shall see,

Noise, song, battle, in the sky fighting perceived

And brute beasts shall be heard to speak.

 

(De nuit soleil penseront avoir veu,

Quand le pourceau demy-homme on verra,

Bruict, chant, bataille, au ciel battre aperceu

Et bestes brutes a parler lon orra.) 

 

NOTES: The half human hog:  = Giuseppe Garibaldi = « the old man born to half-pig, le viellard nay au demi pourceau » (§688, III-69) = « a man by half, le mihom » (§669, VIII-44). “ These three quatrains [VIII-44, I-64 and III-69] are adapted to each other: the « pourceau demy-homme » of the second is the « myhom » of the first and the « demy pourceau » of the third. The Centaur was half a human, half a horse; the Siren, half a woman, half a fish. Here, a human is by half a hog.” (Torné-Chavigny, 1870, p.204).

At night the Sun they shall think to have seen: The general volunteer Garibaldi was passionately welcomed in France, October, 1870, as if he were the Sun in the dark of France in danger of ruin. « Garibaldi in Chalon (Réveil de la Saintonge, Decmber 24, 1870): One reads in the Progrès de Saône-et-Loire: As soon as the report spread that General Garibaldi, Colonel Bordonne, General Bressolles, General Cremer and General Pélissier, surrounded by their high officers, descended in the prefecture, the emotion circulated everywhere and each expects a popular manifestation. The municipal council and the national guard assembled at the town hall and then went to the prefecture, followed by all the population. There Mr. Boysset gave to his illustrious audience an ardent speech  that was acclaimed by the cries of: God save Garibaldi! God save the universal Republic! » (Torné-Chavigny, 1870 [28 mars 1871], p.205). In the context of the lines 1-2, «  the Sun » should be a metaphor for « the half human hog they shall see » because it is what they think to have seen.

Noise: “The republic was proclaimed at the Hotel-de-Ville, and also a provisional government under the name of "government of national defence.'' The government consisted of deputies elected in Paris: Jules Simon, Picard, Gambetta, Pelletan, Garnier-Pagès, Crémieux, Arago, Glais-Bizoin and Rochefort, with General Trochu as president, Thiers having refused this office. The senate had been forgotten, just as in 1848 the chamber of peers had been. It was not remembered till the next day. In the evening, in spite of the threatened invasion, a profound relief was felt. The boulevards were crowded. Improvised chariots bearing inscriptions, and groups of soldiers mingling with the citizens were cheered as they passed. The police had disappeared. One of the most festive occasions during the days that followed was the return of the exiles. All the great men who were welcomed back by their country, Victor Hugo, Louis Blanc, Edgar Quinet, and Ledru-Rollin, came to Paris. The return of Victor Hugo was a regular triumph.” (HH, XIII, p.162-163).

Song, battle: “ Without taking into consideration the artillery, whose fire was so continued and so deadly, each Frenchman fought against ten. At nightfall, driven back on every side, the defenders of Châteaudun collected in the market-place, and, black with powder, excited by the battle, drunk with patriotism and passion, under a sky already red with conflagrations, they chanted the powerful verses of the Marseillaise.” (HH, XIII, p.166).

In the sky fighting perceived: “ The appearance of the town was curious. Guns glittered under the trees on the boulevards, and the sound of trumpets was everywhere. Theatres were changed into hospitals and the railway factories were busy casting cannon. There were no carriages and no gas; at night all was in darkness. Instead of the boulevards, the ramparts became the centre of Parisian life; here everyone, workmen and citizens alike, assembled gun in hand to guard the town. The inhabitants were blockaded. A few hundred yards from the fortifications an invisible circle of trenches enclosed the town. Communication with the outer world was impossible, except by balloons which were sent out of Paris or by the carrier pigeons which returned there pursued by Prussian bullets.” (HH, XIII, p.164). Cf. the 19th-century painting depicting Prussian hussards firing up at a French observation balloon during the Franco-Prussian War in 1870 (DKHistory, p.314).

And brute beasts shall be heard to speak: “At last bombardment brought the siege to an end. The Prussians launched enormous shells, larger than any that had yet been known, into the town, on to the monuments which are the pride of civilisation, on to the hospitals, on to the schools where sometimes the dead bodies of five or six children would be found. They fell, not on the ramparts, but in Paris. All through the night these huge masses of metal, whose fall meant death and destruction, were heard whizzing through the air. But the whole town only became the more enthusiastic, everyone was eager to fight, and not an angry word was heard, unless anyone spoke of surrender.” (HH, XIII, p.165) This kind of metaphor is found also in the quatrain III-44 (§734), where the invention of modern guns capable of successive shooting is prophesied as follows: Quand l’animal à l’homme domestique après grands peines & saults viendra parler (When the domestic animal of men shall arrive at speaking after many pains and leaps. – cf. Motret, 1806, p.45-50; Le Pelletier, I, p.133-134).

Discussion:  

Other interpretations of the verse: the half human hog as some artificial devices such as a baby tank (Roberts, 1947[1999], p.22), a Soviet giant satellite balloon constructed in the image of the porcine Big Brother of the Soviet Animal Farm (Leoni, 1961 [1982], p.582), an oxygen breathing apparatus of a pilot (Cheetham, 1973 [1981], p.53), a gas mask (Ionescu, 1976, p.388; 1987, p.221) should have analysed also the expression of another colleague quatrain: the old man born to half-pig (III-69), which says, entirely against their supposition of artificiality of the thing, that the quality is by birth or through initiation (mental opening, awakening) [see below]  and of a particular old man !  Above all, Ionescu ought to have done the task sincerely according to his principal method of comparison of the texts of Nostradamus (Ionescu, 1976, p.549), but he entirely neglects the two other colleague quatrains !

On the other hand, the so-called retrospectors or copiers, exclusively seeking for some analogy between the verses of Nostradamus and some passages of historical documents anterior to or contemporary with the Prophet, have not explained these compound questions in all. For example, Lemesurier (2003, p.31) explained the quatrain I-64 by means of resorting to classical texts, such as Book of Omens (Julius Obsequens), Mirabilis liber, etc., but, he completely fell into silence in front of the other two colleague quatrains.

As to those by Dufresne attributing this (§689, I-64 - Dufresne, 1989, p.198-199) with the other quatrain (§688, III-69 – Dufresne, 1992, p.192-193) to the theme of Adolf Hitler, he is cheating us grammatically or intentionally concerning the two points:

At first, he replaced secretly the intransitive verb: naître (to be born) of the quatrain III-69 by the transitve: faire naître (to engender) in order to arbitrarily develop the verse pointing only one person (the old man born to half-pig), demonstrated by the third person singular verb Fera,  into another relating to the two (the half-pig = Hitler and the old man = Marshal Pétain), for he interpreted  the phrase: the old man born to half-pig as the old man engendered by the half-pig or the old man, creature of the half-pig (namely, the government of the Marshal was made in 1940 under Hitler), but, « naître à (to be born to) » does not signifiy « to be engendered by », but « to be initiated into, to open into, to be awakened to » (Petit Robert), therefore, the old man born to half-pig means that the old man is opened into a half-pig, namely the old man is open to the life style like a pig, just as Garibaldi is !

And secondly, he replaced in silence the word Mascon, pertinent with Chalon to the military activity in France of Garibaldi in 1870-1871, with the fictitious Marseille in order to explain the German occupation of all the Southern Free France in 1942, in vain because Mâcon was also in the free zone like Marseille. Perhaps, his real intention was to remove, with no textual reason, the place-name Mascon strongly pertinent to Garibaldi in accordance with Chalon.

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© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2014. All rights reserved.

§690

19th century:

§690 The last hand vs. the military hand (1870-1871): VI-33.


VI-33:

His last hand by the sanguinary Struggler,

Shall not be able to be guaranteed by the sea:

Between the two streams shall enclose him the military hand,

The king in anger shall make him repent.

 

(Sa main derniere par Alus sanguinaire,

Ne se pourra par la mer guarantir:

Entre deux fleuves caindre main militaire,

Le noir l'ireux le fera repentir..) 

 

NOTES: Hand:  =  Manus, hand, troop.” (Torné-Chavigny, 1870 [12 avril 1871], p.217).

Alus: “ In Greek, vagabondage, troop of vagabonds.”  (Torné-Chavigny, id.).  « ἄλυς (alus), agitation; ennui, boredom. ἀλύω (aluō), to be deeply stirred, excited; 1. from grief, to be distraught, beside oneself. 2. from perplexity or despair, to be at a loss, perplexed. 3. to be weary, ennuyé. 4. to be fretful, restless. 5. struggle, kick. 6. from joy or exultation (rarely), to be beside oneself. II. later, wander, roam about, lounge idly.» (Liddell & Scott).

The sanguinary Struggler (Alus sanguinaire): = The Government of national Defence im repent: « It was on t “ The republic was proclaimed at the Hotel-de-Ville, and also a provisional government under the name of "government of national defence.'' The government consisted of deputies elected in Paris: Jules Simon, Picard, Gambetta, Pelletan, Garnier-Pagès, Crémieux, Arago, Glais-Bizoin and Rochefort, with General Trochu as president, Thiers having refused this office.” (HH, XIII, p.162).

His last hand … the sea…: « Indefatigable zeal was displayed by the various authorities - the ministry of commerce, the prefecture of the Seine, which was in the hands of a member of the government, Jules Ferry, the mayoralty of Paris, the mayoralties of the arrondissements; but these complicated wheels within wheels hindered each other, their functions not being clearly determined. From September 26th a central victualling committee regulated and combined these various operations, and render valuable services. The government of national defence succeeded in adding to the resources already obtained more than four hundred thousand hundredweights of flour, which represented provisions for two months. It was not sufficient to have corn; it must be ground. After surmounting enormous difficulties, the trade of miller was successfully organised in Paris. All trades connected with food were established in the great city as well as all those concerned with warfare.

Was this the case with the military organisation? It must first be admitted that there, more than in any other department, the difficulties were appalling. There were crowds of men, there were no real soldiers, or scarcely any; too few arms, and few good arms; the new chassepot rifles, already insufficient in number by half, had been stored in quantities at Metz and Strasburg, and there were not enough in Paris. As for the fortifications, since Palikao had become minister and the defence committee had been formed, to which Thiers had been elected, they had worked feverishly to repair, as far as possible, the negligence of the imperial government. Munitions had been stored; the enceinte of Paris and the forts had been put into good condition; from the various ports more than two hundred immense naval guns had been brought to supply the bastions of Paris, together with a picked set of seamen set at liberty by the disarmament of the fleet, which had been unable to make an effort in the Baltic for want of troops to land; there were nearly fourteen thousand brave sailors, commanded by half a dozen vice-admirals and rear-admirals [the sea]. This was the strongest element of defence, and the general officers of the naval army were charged with the defence of the greater number of the divisions of the fortifications - the secteurs as they were called. On the 9th, the 13th corps entered Paris, led back from Mézières by General Vinoy. The 14th corps, which was being formed, was placed by Trochu under command of General Ducrot, who had escaped from the hands of the Prussians. On September 13th there were 60,000 soldiers of the line, the greater number of them raw recruits, 110,000 mobiles, 360,000 national guards. This last number was purely nominal, the greater number of these guards being neither in uniform nor armed, and many not even capable of bearing arms. They finally succeeded in arming 250,000. A large number of the mobiles also were neither equipped nor armed.» (HH, XIII, p.163-164)

Between the two streams: =  Mesopotamia = Paris, whose historico-geographical center, the Île de la Cité (City Island), is situated between the two branchings of the Seine that envelop it. The interpretation of Torné-Chavigny, who places Paris between the Seine and the Marne, is not pertinent because they do not make such an acute angle as to sandwich the entire city of Paris. Another usage of Nostradamus: « the free city, constructed  & seated in another exiguous mezopotamia » (№3, Epistle to Henri II, p.12) indicates that it concerns the Île de la Cité.

The military hand: = “ The Prussian army, model of discipline and military organization.”  (Torné-Chavigny, id., p.217).

His last hand … shall not be able to be guaranteed…: « After the annihilation of all the armies of relief, Paris had nothing more to hope for, unless the grounds for hope were in the city itself. A grand sortie had been planned with Gambetta for the 30th of November. General Ducrot, with about fifty thousand men, was to break through the eastern line of the beleaguering army, march to Fontainebleau, join the army of the Loire, and with it return to the relief of Paris. While demonstrations were being made at other points, Ducrot advanced towards Champigny and Brie on the Marne, drove back the Würtemberg division, of which a part repulsed an attack near Bonneuil and Mesly, and also an incomplete Saxon division out of the villages of Champigny and Brie; but he could advance no further on account of the stubborn resistance of the German troops. On December 2nd the two divisions, assisted by the 2nd army corps and a brigade of the 6th corps under General Fransecky, advanced and after a hot fight retook half of Champigny; whereupon the French evacuated the other half of the place and Brie, and returned with all their troops to the right bank of the Marne. The Würtembergers lost, in these two days of battle, 63 officers and 1,557 men; the Saxons, 82 officers and 1,864 men; the Pomeranians, 87 officers and 1,447 men; the loss of the French was about 10,000 men, among which were about 1,600 prisoners. The sorties against Stains and Le Bourget on December 21st and 22nd were also repulsed. Mont Avron, which had very heavy guns, was abandoned by the French after a bombardment of two days, and the bombardment of the eastern forts was begun. On January 5th after the arrival of the siege-park the bombardment of the southern forts was begun; their fire was soon silenced; and on January 9th began the bombardment of Paris, in which the left bank of the Seine principally suffered, although not to any great extent. Two facts soon became apparent: sorties of the Parisians, seeking to repulse the besiegers, broke through their lines and operated in their rear; and the formation of armies in the provinces, which were intended to go to the relief of the capital, and in conjunction with the Parisian troops, forced the German headquarters to raise the siege. This latter measure was particularly urged by Gambetta, who had left Paris in a balloon on October 6th for Tours, where an external government had been established. Here he took charge of the ministry of war as well as that of the interior, and finally usurped the dictatorship of France. He aimed to stir up the national hatred of the French for the Germans, and to call to the defence of their flag all the able-bodied men of the harassed country [Alus]; he gathered large forces on the Loire, others to the north and west of Paris, and finally succeeded in causing alarm to the besiegers for the safety of their line of retreat. Thus he had indeed the credit of prolonging the war, but he incurred also the responsibility of its taking on a more sanguinary character and of the country's receiving still deeper wounds. The generals of Gambetta were not equal in strategy to those of Moltke, and the discipline of their soldiers was not much better than that of the garde mobile in Paris.» (HH, XIII, p.171-172) .

Between the two streams shall enclose him the military hand: = §687, V-30: All around the grand city, Soldiers shall lodge in fields and towns: “ Preparations were hardly completed when the enemy arrived. On the heights of Châtillon, which was a valuable position for Paris, the Germans found no opposition except from some troops who were already demoralised, being, so to speak, composed of the tail-end of defeated regiments. A panic ensued and the Germans gained possession of the heights, which enabled them to bombard Paris.” (HH, XIII, p.163). « The investment of the city was completed, and Paris was entirely cut off from all communication with the outer world. The positions occupied by the various corps in the line of investment were as follows, commencing from the Seine at Choisy-le-Roi, and making the circuit of the city in the same direction that we enumerated the detached forts. From Choisy-le-Roi to Noisy-le-Grand, encircling the windings of the Marne, the line was kept by the Wurtemberg division. From the latter point, across the forest of Bondy to the convergence of the Eastern Railway with the canal at Livry, by the corps of Saxons. From the Eastern Railway to the Northern Railway, above St. Denis and the Double Couronne-du-Nord, by the Prussian Guards. From the latter point, along the right bank of the Seine to the cross roads at Bezons, west of Neuilly, by the 4th North German Corps. From this point to the bend of the Seine at Bougival, westward of St. Cloud, by the 5th Landwehr of the Guard. From Bougival to Sèvres, across the loop made by the bend of the Seine and consequently almost under fire from Valérien, to St. Cloud and Meudon, by the 5th North German Corps. From Meudon to Bourg-la-Reine, behind the forts of Issy, Vanves, and Montrouge, by the 2nd Bavarian Corps. From Bourg-la-Reine to Choisy-le-Roi, behind Bicêtre and Ivry, completing the circle, by the 6th North German Corps.»  (Rich, II, p.11).

Noir: Anagram of roi (king) (Torné-Chavigny, id., p.219).

The king in anger shall make him repent: « It was on the 20th of February that M. Thiers presented himself at Versailles. Negotiation was out of the question; for, in his own words, he found himself  " face to face with an ultimatum;" arguments availed nothing, in the absence of power to enforce them. Some modifications of details were all that could be obtained, and the time that had been consumed in vain endeavours to soften the terms had brought the negotiators dangerously near the hour when the armistice terminated. On the 26th, no alternative remained but to sign the preliminaries, which included an extension of the armistice till the 12th of March, that the National Assembly might have time to confirm the work of their diplomatic representatives. The principal conditions were: —

1. The cession of Alsace, except Belfort, and of German Lorraine; that is to say, the arrondissements of Metz, Thionville, and Sarreguemines, in the department of the Moselle; of Chateau-Salins and Sarreburg, in the department of the Meurthe; and of the cantons of Schirmech and Saales, in the department of the Vosges. The extent of territory thus surrendered is estimated to be about fifty square miles, with a population of 1,600,000 inhabitants, the two great fortresses of Metz and Strasburg, and many important industrial cities.

2. France agreed to pay a war indemnity of five milliards of francs, equal to two hundred millions sterling.

3. The French territory occupied by the German troops was to be evacuated as follows: The departments or parts of departments situated on the left of the Seine immediately after the ratification of the preliminaries by the Assembly; the rest of France at intervals as the instalments of the war indemnity were paid — that is to say, the departments of the Somme, the Oise, the Seine-Inférieure, Seine and Oise, Seine and Marne, Seine and the forts of Paris on the right bank, after the payment of the first half-milliard (£20,000,000 sterling); the Haute-Saône, the Jura, the Doubs, the Côte d'Or, the Aube and Aisne, after a second payment, not clearly indicated in the preliminaries. The six departments of the Marne, the Ardennes, the Haute-Marne, the Meuse, the Vosges, and the Meurthe, and the arrondissement of Belfort, were to remain occupied by 50,000 men until the entire payment of the indemnity.

4. The French army was to retire to the south of the Loire, and not to pass the line of demarcation before the signature of the definitive treaty of peace; the only exceptions to this disposition being the garrison of Paris, which was not to exceed 40,000 men, and the garrisons indispensable to the security of fortified towns.

5. The prisoners of war were to be at once surrendered.

The enormous amount of the war indemnity, added to the confiscation of territory, was a condition unparalleled in the history of such transactions. But the conquerors avowed their purpose to be to inflict such a blow on France, that she might not be able to recover for many years to come. " France," said M. Bismarck," will never forgive us her disasters. The desire of exacting vengeance for them will be the soul of her future polity, and will urge her to a furious war against us. The simplest common sense makes it our duty to prepare for the event; and the best means we can adopt to resume the struggle favourably is to secure impregnable military positions, and to enfeeble our adversary by the diminution of her territory." This seems logical; but it is the logic of the sword [The king in anger shall make him repent].

It had been stipulated in the 4th article of the Convention of January 28th, that the German army should not enter Paris. The new Convention of February 26th modified that article, and stipulated that a part of Paris — the quarter of the Champs-Elysées — should be occupied by 30,000 German soldiers. This was the price exacted by M. Bismarck for the retention of Belfort by France, and the prolongation of the armistice. M. Thiers used every possible argument to induce the Emperor William to forego this demand: his Majesty imperturbably replied [The king in anger shall make him repent]  that " he owed that satisfaction to Germany," and M. Thiers could not pretend that Belfort was too dear at the price.» (Rich, II, p. 560-561).

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© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2014. All rights reserved.

§691

19th century:

§691 French evacuation of Rome; Napoleon III dethroned (1867-1871): II-26.


II-26:

For the favor the city shall show

To the great who shall soon lose his battlefield,

Flee the Po, the brigade ! The Ticino shall shed its blood,

Fires, deaths, the drowned in the massive shooting.

 

(Pour la faveur que la cité fera

Au gran qui tost perdra champ de bataille,

Fuis le rang Po, Thesin versera

De sang, feuz, morts, noyes de coup de taille.) 

 

NOTES: For the favor the city shall show To the great…Flee the Po, the brigade !:  = Notwithstanding the favorable relations between Rome and Napoleon III [since 1867], who is destined to lose soon in the battlefield [September 2nd, 1870], you, the French garrison in Rome, flee from the Po [August 19th, 1870] to relieve your country faced with strong Prussians [since the 19th of July, 1870], the preposition FOR (POUR) marking “ in exchange for ” by antiphrasis.

The favor the city shall show To the great: « The party of action was agitating for hastening the solution of the Roman question. This question entered upon a new phase after the departure of the French from Rome [in 1866]. The first announcement of the new proposals of the party of action was a proclamation from Garibaldi, published in July of 1867, which invited the Romans to rebel and the Italians to hold themselves in readiness to help him. The agitation once created, it was increased and fomented by every means; and as the waves rose the words of the great patriot became more ardent and violent. When Garibaldi left Florence for Arezzo, to assume command of the volunteers stationed on the borders, the government, which had let him go so far, removed him from command and had him taken to the fortress of Alessandria. But it did nothing to disperse the volunteers who had received from Garibaldi himself the word of command to prosecute the undertaking; and soon afterwards terrified at his ardour the government sent the prisoner free to Caprera, without even exacting a promise to remain quietly there, thinking it was sufficient guarantee to have the island watched by a few warships. Meanwhile a band of Garibaldians of about 200 men entered Viterbo and there instituted a provisionary government under the name of  ''committee of insurrection." At the same time two other companies passed the frontier. But grave news arrived at that time from France. The French journals announced that preparations for a fresh Roman expedition were in progress at the port of Toulon, and following this announcement there came a note (October 19th) from the government saying that France  would intervene with her forces if the Italian government did not put a stop to the Garibaldian movement…A victory gained October 25th by Garibaldi at Monterotondo over the papal troops fomented the  enthusiasm of the insurgent youths so that they feared no danger, nor were they checked by any obstacle. The dangers and obstacles increased immeasurably. After long vacillation the emperor seeing the impotence of the Italian government to end the Garibaldian invasion had determined on French intervention in the Roman state…  The Châssepots had conquered; Rome was once more in the hands of the French [October 30th, 1867]. The royal troops remained in the pontifical territories, but the French minister having protested against this occupation, the government, not wishing further to aggravate an already strained situation, ordered them to be recalled and the king took advantage of this act of abnegation to send a letter to the emperor Napoleon in which he conjured him, in the interest of the Napoleonic dynasty, to break definitely with the clerical party and order the immediate recall of the troops from Rome. But Napoleon III was deaf to this advice, which was nevertheless wise; he would not break the hybrid union with the clerical party, and reaped from it, as recompense, the union in the same grave of the papal monarchy and the Napoleonic empire. The answer was given by the French minister of foreign affairs, Rouher, the faithful executor and interpreter of his masters' policy. In the discussion which took place in the legislative assembly on the new expedition to Rome, this minister said that the Italians had “ never had Rome.”» (HH, IX, p.617-621).

The Ticino [symbolizing the Sardinian king of Italy Victor Emmanuel] shall shed its blood [to accomplish Italian unifcation]: « In vain had Victor Emmanuel sent his envoy to Rome with an autograph letter in which he appealed to the heart of the pope “ with the affection of a son, the loyalty of a king, and the soul of an Italian,” that he would permit the royal troops, already posted in the outskirts of Rome, to enter and occupy such positions in the Roman territory as was necessary for the maintenance of order and the safe-guarding of the pontiff. Pius IX held firmly to his refusal, saying he would yield to force but not to injustice. Then it was necessary to resort to force. The government gave orders to General Raffaele Cadorna to pass the borders with his troops, at the same time informing the European governments, by means of a circular letter, of the resolution taken and justifying its action by pointing out the impossibility of reconciling Italy with papal Rome and the necessity of procuring peace and security for Italy. The note then reassured the powers as to the steps Italy would take for the safeguard of the pope's spiritual power so that his liberty and independence might be complete. On September 11th [1870] Cadorna entered the pontifical territories. On the 17th the Italian soldiers were at Civitavecchia, and on the 19th under the walls of Rome. But Pius IX had determined on his course of conduct and was resolved to pursue it at any cost. His views were expressed in his letter written September 19th to General Kanzler, the commander-in-chief of the papal force. In it Pius IX ordered Kanzler to treat with the enemy on the slightest breach of the walls of Rome “ as the defence was solely to be suffcient to serve as proof of an act of violence and nothing more.” And so it happened; at half-past five on the morning of September 21st the Italian soldiers opened fire between the Pia and the Sorlara gates and at the gate of St. John and St. Pancras, and hardly was a breach made when the papal troops ceased fire and hoisted the white flag on all the batteries. A messenger was sent to Cadorna and it was speedily agreed that Rome should surrender all but the Leonine city, whicn should for the present remain under the jurisdiction of the pope. Then the papal troops were awarded the honours of war, but were obliged to lay down arms and flags. The peasant soldiers were sent back to their homes and all foreigners despatched to their respective countries at the expense of the Italian government. The taking possession of Rome by King Victor Emmanuel and the voluntary retirement of Pius IX to the Vatican closes the revolutionary era to which these two personages have given their names. It had led on the one hand to the constitutional unity of Italy, and on the other to the suppression of the states of the church, — the last vestige of ecclesiastical immunities of the Middle Ages to the exclusively spiritual constitution of the sovereign pontiff of universal Catholicism, — two of the most important changes accomplished in the history of politics and European civilisation.» (HH, IX, p.621-623)

De taille: « très grand (very great), très important (very important)(Petit Robert)

Fires, deaths, the drowned in the massive shooting [of the Prussian army]: « [January 1871] At last bombardment brought the siege to an end. The Prussians launched enormous shells, larger than any that had yet been known, into the town, on to the monuments which are the pride of civilisation, on to the hospitals, on to the schools where sometimes the dead bodies of five or six children would be found. They fell, not on the ramparts, but in Paris. All through the night these huge masses of metal, whose fall meant death and destruction, were heard whizzing through the air.» (HH, XIII, p.165)

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© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2014. All rights reserved.

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Koji Nihei Daijyo

Author:Koji Nihei Daijyo
We have covered 143 quatrains (§588-§730) concerning the World Events in the 19th century after Napoleonic ages [1821-1900] in the Prophecies of Nostradamus, and 219 in the 20th [1901-2000] (§731-§949).

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