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§748 The Hindenburg Line broken, Ludendorff crashed to the floor; Revolution in Germany and Austria (1918): IV-13.

IV-13 (§748):

Of a larger loss the news brought back,
The report made, the camp shall be startled:
Anti-union of bands in revolt:
The double army shall abandon their great.

(De plus grand perte nouvelles raportées,
Le raport fait le camp s'estonnera:
Bandes unies encontre revoltées:
Double phalange grand abandonnera.)

NOTES: N. Centurio's interpretation of the quatrain (1953, p.89-90), followed by that of V. Ionescu (1976, p.396-397), is the first reasonable one to be taken into consideration.

Of a larger loss the news brought back, The report made, the camp shall be startled: « Breaking the Hindenburg Line The attack on the Hindenburg Position, whose defences were up to three miles in depth and included the St Quentin Canal which made a superb anti-tank ditch, was made in the Battles of Cambrai and St Quentin, from 27 September until 10 October [1918]. ... by 5 October, the attacking Allied armies had broken through the whole Hindenburg Position. This opend the way for a war of movement and an advance towards the vital main German communications routes. This group of assaults was undertaken in three phases. First came the storming of the Canal-du-Nord position on the left in the Battle of St Quentin Canal, and the advance on Cambrai. Following this came the shattering blow which, after a stupendous artillery bombardment and with the help of hundred of tanks, broke through the Hindenburg Line and turned the defences of St Quentin. Lastly came the exploitation of these successes by a general attack on the whole front which broke through the last of the enemy defences and captured the Beaurevoir Line, to the rear of the Hindenburg Line, and the high ground above it, by 10 October. The Germans were forced to evacuate Cambrai and St Quentin and pull back to the river Selle. These three battles created a huge salient in the German position [Of a larger loss the news brought back]. Meanwhile, further north, in the Fifth Battle of Ypres on 28 and 29 September, King Albert of Belgium’s Army Group of twelve Belgian divisions, Plumer’s Second Army (ten British divisions), and Degoutte’s Sixth Army (six French divisions) forced the Germans back from Ypres and drove yet another salient into their lines, endangering the German position on the Belgian coast. In one day these armies swept over the ground that had taken two British armies, assisted by a French army, three months to capture the previous year. Meanwhile Ludendorff, receiving news on 28 September of the Bulgarian request for an armistice, and after the Allied attack in Flanders had begun, suffered a temporary mental and physical collapse, a crisis of nerve in which he crashed to the floor and even foamed at the mouth [The report made, the camp shall be startled].» (Chasseaud, 2013, p.272-278).

Anti-union of bands in revolt: « The German fleet had mutinied on 29 October, while the German army, while it had been experiencing increasing indiscipline and desrtion in the latter part of 1918, had been comprehensively defeated in the field. Revolution broke out in Berlin.» (Chasseaud, id., p.278); « 1918 Nov: 3rd, German grand fleet mutinies at Kiel; 9th, republic proclaimed in Bavaria; - revolution in Berlin, Prince Max resigns, William II abdicates and a council of People’s Delegates assumes power; 11th, armistice signed between Allies and Germany.» (Williams, 1968, p.472).

The double army shall abandon their great
: = The allied armies shall abandon their emperors through their military collapse = The two great emperors shall abdicate in the face of the defeat of their allied armies: « The Kaiser abdicated on 9 November, and the following day the desperate German authorities told their armistice delegation to accept any terms put in front of them.» (Chasseaud, id.); « The pursuit of the beaten enemy all along the line was only halted by the Armistice at 11 a.m. on 11 November.» (Chasseaud, id.); « 1918 Nov: 3rd, Allies sign armistice with Austria-Hungary (to come into force 4th); 12th, Emperor Charles I abdicates in Austria (and, 13th, in Hungary); - Austria proclaims union with Germany.» (Williams, 1968, p.471-472).
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§749 The break of the Great War and heavy suffering of the French, the British and the Italians (1914-1918): I-26.

I-26 (§749):

The great shall fall to the ground by a thunderbolt by day,
An evil predicted by a claiming bearer
Following the presage a conflict shall occur by night
Reims, London, Etruscan plague-stricken.

(Le grand du fouldre tumbe d'heure diurne,
Mal & predict par porteur postulaire
Suivant presaige tumbe d'heure nocturne,
Conflit Reins, Londres, Etrusque pestifere.)

NOTES:  « I-26 (1914) Outbreak of the war 1914: As if through a thunderbolt from the sky the nations of Europe were startled by the news of the assassination of the Austrian heir to the throne. The First World War breaks out, it involves France, England and later Italy into its turbulence.» (Centurio, 1953, p.36).

Tumber: = Tomber (to fall); « TOMBER. Souvent tumber au moyen âge et encore dans beaucoup de parlers.
(TOMBER. Frequently tumber in the Middle Ages and yet in many speeches.) » (Bloch & Wartburg).

Le grand du fouldre tumbe d'heure diurne, Mal & predict par porteur postulaire: The construction is to be as follows: Le grand tumbe du fouldre d'heure diurne, & mal predict par porteur postulaire.

The great shall fall to the ground by a thunderbolt by day (Le grand tumbe du fouldre d'heure diurne) = The assassination in Sarajevo = §737, X-63: The death of two herons = 1914 assassination of Archduke of Austria and his wife in Sarajevo; « Francis Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria [The great] (1863-1914); nephew of Francis Joseph and heir to the Austrian throne from 1889. Francis Ferdinand was a man of strong character. In 1900 he morganatically married the Countess Sophie Chotek (a Czech); the insults and affronts to which his wife was exposed by the petty restrictions of antiquated etiquette made Francis Ferdinand hostile to the régime and he became on bad terms with his uncle, the Emperor. Speculation on the extent to which Francis Ferdinand would have been a reforming monarch is, however, vain; on June 28th, 1914, he was assassinated [The great shall fall to the ground], with his wife, on a ceremonial visit to Sarajevo [by day], by a Bosnian Serb fanatic [by a thunderbolt], an event that precipitated the First World War.» (Palmer, p.103).

Postulaire
(claiming): From a Latin « postulō demander, réclamer (to assert, to claim).» (Nimmo).

An evil predicted by a claiming bearer
: « La guerre (Mal) déjà prédite (et predict) dans l’ultimatum envoyé (par porteur postulaire) [The war already predicted in the communicated ultimatum] » (Ionescu, 1976, p.383).

Suivant presaige tumbe d'heure nocturne, Conflit Reins, Londres, Etrusque pestifere: The construction is to be as follows: Suivant presaige Conflit tumbe d'heure nocturne, Reins, Londres, Etrusque pestifere.

Following the presage a conflict shall occur by night
: Following the exigent and harsh claim to Serbia by Austria-Hungary dated on 23 July, 1914, a great war shall break out in the dark European atmosphere on 28 July; « 1914 Jul: 23rd, Austro-Hungarian ultimatum to Serbia; 24th, Edward Grey [British foreign secretary] proposes four-power mediation of Balkan crisis, but Serbia appeals to Russia; 26th, Austrians mobilise on Russian frontier; 28th, Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia.» (Williams, 1968, p.446).

Pestifere
: = « pestiféré, ée adj. Plague-stricken.» (Dubois); Pest (peste): This word, as well as the words pestilence, pestilent and pestifere (pestiferous), is figurative, non literal, for most of the expressions indicative of natural phenomena such as " earthquake, rain, tempest, dryness, inundation", etc. are not literal for Nostradamus, but figurative, describing metaphorically wars, revolts, social troubles, collective distress, etc., conditioned principally by human comportments (cf. Introduction §5). In fact, of 38 usages of the words « peste », « pestilence », « pestilent» and « pestifere », 32 are figurative for the warlike and social disasters and menaces, only 5 literal (II-19, II-37, II-46, II-53, II-65) and one for the real seism (VIII-84).

Reins
: = Reims representing France; « Les mots “Conflict Reims” sont suffisants pour mettre ce quatrain parmi ceux concernant la première guerre mondiale (The words ‘Conflict Reims’ are sufficient [for us] to put this quatrain among those concerning the World War I).» (Ionescu, id., p.381).

Londres
: = London representing Britain.

Etrusque
: = Etruscan representing Italian.

France
(Reims), Britain (London), Italy (Etruscan) plague-stricken: = Heavy suffering of the main Allied belligerents of Western Europe in the Great War: « Casualties, 1914-18 (in thousands): British Empire Killed 767 Wounded 2,090; France Killed 1,383 Wouded 2,560; Italy Killed 564 Wouded 1,030.» (Williams, 1968, p.471).
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© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2018. All rights reserved. 

§750 The foundation of the League of Nations with unexpected results (1918-1946): V-12.

V-12 (§750):

Near Lake Leman the grand retinues shall be led,
By a foreign virgin wishing to deliver them a city,
Before her depression at Augsburg:
And those of the Rhine shall come to invade its member-states.

(Aupres du lac Leman sera conduite,
Par garse estrange cité voulant trahir:
Avant son meurtre à Auspourg la grand suitte
Et ceulx du Ryn la viendront invahir.)

NOTES: Garse: = « garce, s.f., jeune fille (a young girl) » (Godefroy).

Trahir: = Livrer (to deliver); « TRAHIR. (1080; lat. tradere, proprem. « livrer »).» (Petit Robert).

The grand retinues: = the delegations to Geneva of member-states of the League.

Invahir: = « invadir, assaillr, attaquer (to assail, to attack).» (Godefroy).

[1°] A. Lamont’s interpretation of the quatrain, not fully penetrating, is fairly suggestive in delivering the theme of the League of Nations, and [2°] the historical explanations by Palmer will wholly justify the prophetic quatrain of Nostradamus.

1° « Auprès du lac Leman sera conduite Par garde [sic] étrange, Cité voulant trahir, Avant son meurtre, à Augsburg la grand suite Et ceux de Rhin le viendront envahir. TRANSLATION: Near Lake Leman (Geneva) it will be conducted under a foreign guardian willing to betray the City (principles of the League). Before she (the League) is murdered Germans will follow (enter) it. And (later) those of Rhineland will come to attack it. INTERPRETATION: From the beginning the League followed principles dictated by dominant groups within, who were moved not by unselfish devotion to humanity but by their own interests. In 1926 Germany entered it as a member, but after the rise of Hitler she attacked it incessantly and sought its destruction.» (Lamont, 1944, p.148).

2°« Wilson, Woodrow (1856-1924), born in Virginia... He secured Democratic nomination for President in 1912... Mexican raids over the U.S. frontier forced him to send a punitive expedition in 1916. He followed strict neutrality in the European War, seeking statements of war aims from the rival belligerents and being prepared to mediate. He won the 1916 Election on the slogan ‘He Kept Us Out of War’, but the resumption by the Germans of unrestricted U-boat attacks (February 1st, 1917) and intrigues shown by the Zimmermann Telegram forced him, on April 6th, to enter the war as a co-belligerent ‘associated power’, free, if he wished, to make a separate peace. On January 8th, 1918, Wilson issued his Fourteen points as a basis for peace, stressing the need for a League of Nations [the grand retinues shall be led, By a foreign virgin]. Wilson attended the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, his rapturous reception in Europe blinding him to political realities [a virgin] not only among the Allied politicians, who were less high-minded than he, but also in the U.S. Senate, which had already passed under Republican control. He was forced in Paris to accept compromises, trusting that the League would right the wrongs of the treaties in due course. On returning to America Wilson found that the Senate would not ratify the Treaty of Versailles (which contained the League Covenant) [her depression at Augsburg (Augsburg was often the siege of the imperial Diet [reminiscent of a Senate] of the Holy Roman Empire and the irregular orthography AUSPouRg may imply USA PResident)]. Three weeks after beginning a nationwide campaign to win public support for his ideas, Wilson collapsed (September 26th, 1919). He was an invalid for the last three and a half years of his life.» (Palmer, p.304-305); « League of Nations. An international organization created in 1920 to preserve peace and settle disputes by arbitration or conciliation. Its headquarters were at Geneva [a city near Lake Leman]... The Covenant (i.e. constitution) of the League was incorporated in each of the peace treaties. When Congress refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles, the U.S.A. dissociated itself from the League and never became a member. Germany belonged to the League only from 1926 to 1933, Japan withdrew from the League in 1933, Italy in 1937... It was formally dissolved in April 1946.» (Palmer, p.157-158); « Tripartite Pact. An undertaking for co-operation in establishing the ‘New Order’ in Europe and ‘Greater East Asia’ signed originally by Germany, Italy and Japan in Berlin [those of the Rhine] (September 27th, 1940). The signatories to the Pact undertook to assist each other if one of them was attacked by a Power not already in the War when the Pact was signed. This stipulation seems to have been intended to operate especially against the U.S.A.» (Palmer, p.287); « World War II had its origins in German unwillingness to accept Versailles frontiers and the Anglo-French pledge of support to Poland of April 1939. German forces invaded Poland [m.-s. (member-state) of the League] on September 1st, 1939, and overran the country in four weeks. Britain [m.-s.] and France [m.-s.] declared war on Germany on September 3rd but avoided major operations. In April 1940 the Germans occupied Denmark [m.-s.] and Norway [m.-s.] (where Allied troops resisted for two months). The invasion of Belgium [m.-s.] and Holland [m.-s.] on May 10th, 1940, opened the period of ‘lightning-war’ (Blitzkrieg) in which penetration by German tanks and use of air power encompassed the fall of the Netherlands within four days, Belgium within three weeks and France within seven weeks. Failure to secure air superiority over Britain frustrated Hitler’s plans of invasion and, while continuing submarine attacks on British supply routes, the Germans moved eastwards, invading Yugoslavia [m.-s.] and Greece [m.-s.] in April 1941 and attacking Russia on a 2,000 mile front on 22nd June (in alliance with Finland, Hungary and Roumania)... Japan’s desire for Asiatic expansion induced her to attack British [m.-s.] and American bases on December 7th, 1941 (Germany and Italy declaring war on the U.S.A. three days later). Within four months the Japanese were masters of south-east Asia and Burma [colonies of Britain, France and Holland] and it was not until June 1942 that naval victories in the Pacific stemmed their advance. In the war against Germany, the second battle of Alamein at the end of October 1942 marked the turn of the tide for the British. Allied troops ejected the Germans and Italians from North Africa (October 1942-May 1943), invaded Sicily and Italy and forced the Italians to make a separate peace (September 3rd, 1943)...» (Palmer, p.307).
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© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2018. All rights reserved. 

§751 The end of 17 reigns of Romanov Dynasty in 1917 and on the 17th (1613-1918): VI-59.

VI-59 (§751):

The lady in fury because of passion for adultery,
Shall come to her prince to pray him to say no,
But soon shall be known the vituperator,
That the dynasty of 17 reigns shall suffer martyrdom in 1917 and on the 17th.

(Dame en fureur par raige d'adultere,
Viendra à son prince conjurer non de dire:
Mais bref cogneu sera le vitupere,
Que seront mis dixsept à martire.)

NOTES: V. Ionescu’s identification of the theme of the quatrain as Russian Revolution of 1917 (Ionescu, 1976, p.427-428) is amazingly smart, but the essential point in question is not the Revolution itself, but the tragic fate of the Romanovs before and in the Revolution, and his explications in detail are hardly sufficient.

The lady: = the Tsaritsa Alexandra (1872-1918). Of 23 usages of the term DAME in the Prophecies of Nostradamus, 17 are for ladies: a queen, a princess or a female, and 6 metaphorically for a state (II-44: France of Napoleon I, II-87: France of Louis XVIII, V-9: France of Napoleon III, VI-19: Spanish government of Popular Front in 1936, VII-18: France subordinate to Prussia in 1870 and X-25: Great Britain). Ionescu’s interpretation of the term ‘lady (dame)’ as ‘the people (le peuple)’ (id., p.427) is not pertinent.

Her prince: = the Tsar Nicholas II (1868-1918).

Adultery: An extraordinary relation between the Tsaritsa Alexandra, a fervent implorer as to her Baby’s haemophilia, and a strange monk Rasputin capable of effecting a temporary cure of it. Ionescu’s interpretation of the term ‘adultery’ as ‘revolution’ (id., p.427) is not pertinent.

The lady in fury because of passion for adultery, Shall come to her prince to pray him to say no [to her critics]: Alexandra in fury because of her passion for communicating with a charismatic monk Rasputin (c.1871-1916), who only can, she believes, treat the Tsarevitch Alexey (1904-1918) for haemophilia, shall resist her critics with the Tsar on her side: « The whole focus and dynamic of the Romanov family had shifted dramatically when, at 1.15 p.m. on Friday [sic] 30 July 1904, Nicholas and Alexandra’s fifth child had been born. At last the family had been ‘visited by the grace of God’, Nicholas wrote in his diary. He had answered his and his wife’s years of fervent prayers and had sent a son as comfort ‘in time of sore trials’, Russia then being in the midst of a disatrous war with Japan... But then, on 8 September, only six weeks after Alexey’s birth, the Romanov family’s world imploded and Alexandra’s delirous joy turned to implacable grief. Her baby started bleeding from the navel. It was the first unmistakable sign of the deadly condition of haemophilia – passed down unwittingly in the female line from Alexandra’s grandmother Queen Victoria to the royal houses of Germany, Spain and Russia. Privately, Nicholas and Alexandra were advised of the truth, but there would be no public annoucements, not ever...» (Rappaport, 2008, p.87-88); « ... for Alexandra, her son’s health had become a daily crusade, a battle for the Tsarevich’s survival and with it that of the dynasty. It changed her irrevocably, opening the door wide to the pernicious influences of every faith-healer, soothsayer, clairvoyant, charlatan, and miracle-worker who came offering a cure. Not the least among them was the ‘holy man’ Rasputin, whose appearance in 1905 and the Tsaritsa’s subsequent dependence on him set the doomed dynasty on its final one-way path to vilification and eventual annihilation. Her escalating desperation, bordering on hysteria, to find a miracle ‘cure’ meant she was perfectly primed to embrace Rasputin’s powers as a bozhii chelovek – a man of God and healer. When Alexey had attacks of bleeding, Rasputin demonstrated an uncanny ability to calm, if not mentally ‘tranquillise’ him through the medium of hypnotism or autosuggestion of some kind, thus slowing down the bleeding by lowering the stress that raises blood pressure. No one could explain Rasputin’s power except the Tsaritsa; she put it all down to God’s intervention, and thus she would defend the man she called ‘Our Friend’ as her son’s last hope to the bitter end, no matter what odium it brought on her and the monarchy. She refused to listen to tales of Rasputin’s lasciviousness, drunkenness and womanising, or accusations about his meddling in political matters, at the risk of alienating her last few friends and closest relatives. As for the Tsar, he capitulated to his wife’s neurotic dependency on the man [passion for adultery (raige d’adultere)] and kept his reservations about Rasputin himself: ‘Better one Rasputin than ten fits of hysterics a day’ had been his weary comment [Shall come to her prince to pray him to say no].» (id., p.91); « When the Tsarevich was well, everything and everybody ‘seemed bathed in sunshine’. Alexey would take centre stage as the adorable, happy boy in a sailor suit – innocent, vibrant and lovable, Russia’s great hope for the future. But the realists in the Imperial entourage, such as the Tsar’s physician Dr Evgeny Botkin, were doubtful that the boy would ever live to become Tsar. They did their best for him, administering regular massage and electrotherapy during the prolonged enforced periods of rest that followed attacks, which left his leg muscles weak and atrophied. But sooner or later they anticipated his premature death. In October 1912 in Bialoveza in Poland, Alexey cheated it by a whisper. Showing off in front of his attendant Derevenko one day by jumping into a sunken bath, he stumbled and hit his groin. The ensuing swelling seemed to go down, but two weeks later when out with his mother for a carriage ride at the family’s hunting lodge at Spala, the jolts of the road caused him to cry out with pain in his back and stomach. A haemorrhage in his upper left thigh had spread, with blood from the injury seeping into his abdomen, the pressure of the swelling on the nerves of his leg causing agonising pain... For 11 days Alexandra refused to leave her son’s bedside, rarely taking time to rest or eat and only occasionally allowing the Tsar to replace her. Nicholas wept for his son, his only way of dealing with the situation being to internalise his grief and carry on hunting. For four days Alexey drifted in and out of delirium; at one lucid moment emtreating his mother in a whisper, ‘when I am dead build me a little monument of stones in the wood’. A priest administered the last rites and the whole of the Imperial entougage at Spala held their breath. As a last desperate act Alexandra begged Anna Vyrubova to send a telegram to Rasputin in Siberia. The message came back that the doctors should not attempt to intervene; ‘the little one will not die’. Within an hour the crisis was over and the haemorrhaging stopped. The combined medical specialists of Russia were baffled: they could find no explanation for this spontaneous recovery. So severe had been the attack that Alexey, now painfully thin and pale, was kept in bed for a month. He was not able to walk again properly for a year and had to have a metal brace fitted to his leg to prevent him becoming permanently lame. For Alexandra, Spala was final vindication of her faith in Rasputin, the absolute, incontrovertible proof she needed to silence his critics. She would not tolerate a word said against him thereafter – by anybody, including her own sister, Ella, whose words of warning about Rasputin’s destructive influence prompted Alexandra to turn her back on her forever.» (id., p.92-93). Ionescu’s interpretation of the phrase ‘non de dire ’ as ‘to abdicate’ (id., p.427) is not pertinent.

Le vitupere
: = Le vitupereur (the vituperator) = the communists opposing the monarchy. Ionescu’s interpretation of the term ‘le vitupere’ as ‘who are worthy of being blamed’ (id., p.428) is utterly upside-down.

But soon shall be known the vituperator
: The scandal of Rasputin having been liquidated by his murder by the aristocrats in December, 1916, there will appear the real Opposer of the monarchy in March, 1917: « The Russian Revolutions (March and November) Prefigured by an earlier revolt in 1905, the Russian Revolution had about it a certain inevitability. Tsarist rule was autocratic, and the social system aristocratic, sychophantic and inflexible. Tsar Nicholas II was weak, and his German wife, the Tsarina Alexandra, was a fervent supporter of autocracy and was under the baleful influence of the charismatic monk Rasputin until he was murdered by aristocrats in December 1916. The war had not been going well for Russia; the high command was inefficient and junior officers often brutal to their men, while a vast swathe of territory had been lost, and each year had taken a terrible toll in casualties. In common with much of Europe, the winter of 1916-17 was severe enough to curtail food supplies. These had already been shrinking because of labour shortages caused by conscription and by wartime transport problems. Food shortages, compounded by rising prices, led to strikes. The peasants, hungry and angry, wanted land. The urban population, restive because of falling real wages, demanded bread. By using the slogan ‘Peace, Land, Bread’, Bolshevik agitators were able to maximize their support from soldiers, urban workers and peasants. In the cold, short, dark days of early 1917, desperation was growing among Russians. In Petrograd (St Petersburg) bread riots, in which soldiers of the garrison joined, turned into revolution on 8 March. This challenge became a crisis when Cossaks refused to shoot at rioters. Four days later the Soviet (Council of Workers’ and Soldiers’ Deputies) was set up, which regarded itself as independent of the liberal opposition. The Soviet quietly planned to undermine the army and seize power. The Tsar, trying to return to Petrograd from his military headquarters, was stopped and turned back. On 15 March the liberals convinced the generals that the Tsar no longer had the support of the army and forced him to abdicate.» (Chasseaud, 2013, p.218-219). Ionescu’s interpretation of the term ‘soon (bref)’as ‘in October’ (id., p.427) is not pertinent.

That 17 reigns of Romanov Dynasty shall suffer martyrdom in 1917 and on 17 July, 1918
:

Seventeen
(dixsept): The term ‘seventeen’ has a triple meaning: (1) the seventeen reigns of Romanov Dynasty, (2) the year 1917 of Nicholas II’s abdication without successor, and (3) the day of 17th of July, 1918 when the Romanov family were executed.

(1) The 17 reigns of the dynasty of Romanov (1613-1917): Michael Romanov (1613-45), 2° Alexey (1645-76), 3° Theodore (1676-82), 4° joint reign of John V (1682-89) and Peter I (1682-1725), 5° Catherine I (1725-27), 6° Peter II (1727-30), 7° Anna Ivanovnav (1730-1740), 8° John VI (1740-41), 9° Elisabeth (1741-62), 10° Peter III (1762/1/5-7/17), 11° Catherine the Great (1762/7/17-96), 12° Paul I (1796-1801), 13° Alexander I (1801-25), 14° Nicholas I (1825-55), 15° Alexander II (1855-81), 16° Alexander III (1881-94), 17° Nicholas II (1894-1917); « Alexey’s slow recovery after the attack at Spala meant that during the crucial Romanov publicity campaign for the tercentenary in 1913 he had to be carried in public ceremonials, prompting people to ask themselves whether the future of Russia was to be in the hands of ‘a cripple’...» (Rappaport, 2008, p.94).

(2) The abdication of the last Tsar Nicholas II: « It is evident that the number 17 was placed here in allusion to the year 1917, the year of the Revolution, where the Russian people were martyred.» (Ionescu, 1976, p.428) [N.B. It is not the Russian people, but the Romanovs that were martyred by them.]; « Although singularly unsuited for high military office, Nicholas assumed Supreme Command of the Russian Armies in September 1915 and it was at his headquarters at Pskov that he was forced to abdicate, March 15th, 1917.» (Palmer, p.202); « 1917, March 15 (midnight) End of the dynasty of the Romanovs. Upon the demand of the delegates of the Provisional Government, the Tsar Nicholas II signs his abdication at Pskov (south-west of Leningrad). His brother, the Archduke Michael refuses the throne.» (Jouette, p.223).

(3) The execution of the Romanov family: « He [Nicholas II] was kept in seclusion in various parts of Russia until July 16th, 1918, when he was murdered, along with his family, at Ekaterinburg (now Sverdlovsk) on the orders of a local Bolshevik commander who feared that the royal family would be rescued by counter-revolutionary troops.» (Palmer, p.202); « 1918 Jul: 16th, execution of ex-Tsar Nicholas II and family on orders of Ural Regional Council.» (Williams, 1968, p.470); « 1918, July 16-17 (the night of) The White Army of Admiral Kolchak approaching Ekaterinburg, Yurovsky and his Bolshevik Latvians, charged with guarding the Romanov family, kill the Tsar Nicholas II, the Tsarina Alexandra, their son Alexey and their four daughters Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia, as well as the persons of their suite (Dr Botkin, maid Demidova, cook Kharitonov, footman Trupp) in the basement of the Ipatiev House [a house in the centre of Ekaterinburg belonging to a retired engineer named Nikolay Ipatiev requisitioned by the local soviet as the Romanovs’ new place of detention].» (Jouette, p.229); « Thursday 4 July 1918. And so, on Thursday 4 July, a new commandant arrived. His name was Yakov Yurovsky, and brought with him an assistant, an attractive young man called Grigory Nikulin, who in Alexandra’s estimation seemed ‘decent’ in comparison to his vulgar predecessor Moshkin. Little did she know that the bland-looking Nikulin was a ruthless killer... » (Rappaport, 2008, p.30); « Friday 12 July 1918. Yurovsky was now formally entrusted with the final preparations for the execution, codenamed, improbably, trubochist – ‘chimney sweep’. All he had to do now, as Goloshchekin [a member of the presidium of the Ural Regional Soviet and the newly appointed regional commissar for war] assured him, was wait for the signal from Moscow.» (Rappaport, 2008, p.143); « Tuesday 16 July 1918. A coded telegram was therefore sent by Goloshchekin and Safarov [a member of the URS’s presidium] at around six that evening, addressed to Lenin in Moscow. All was ready; they were now awaiting the final signal that operation trubochist could go ahead... Inside the house Yurovsky was finalising arrangements for execution. All now depended on the truck; earlier that afternoon, he had ordered his chauffeur Lyukhanov to put in an order with the Ekaterinburg Military Garage for a truck to take the bodies away, bringing with it rolls of canvas to wrap them in. The intention was to have it parked as close to the basement entrance as possible, within the double palisade, with its engine running to mask the noise of gunshots. If the engine backfired then so much the better. As the regular change of guard came at 10 p.m. and new men arrived, the Romanovs sat upsatirs reading and playing cards. Nicholas and Alexandra were enjoying a final game of bezique as the men who were to be their executioners gathered in the basement rooms downstairs... The open-topped Fiat truck finally rattled off across the silent streets of the city. Operation trubochist was at last swinging into action. Commandant Yurovsky got up from his chair, went out on to the landing and rang the bell at the double doors of the Romanovs’ sitting room. It was 1.30 in the morning of 17 July 1918. The Ipatiev House was now about to fulfil the ‘Special Purpose’ for which it had been summarily requisitioned only three monts ago.» (Rappaport, 2008, p.178-183); « Wendesday 17 July 1918. It was about 2.15 a.m. when Yurovsky and Nikulin, accompanied by two of the internal guard with rifles, led the family in the semi-darkness down the steep, narrow stairs to the ground floor. Instinctively the Romanovs followed the order of precedence inculcated in them, the Tsar in front but refusing all assistance as he struggled with the burden of Alexey, who winced with pain from his bandaged leg; then Alexandra, using a stick and leaning heavily on Olga’s arm, followed by the three other girls. They all then exited the house by the door leading out into the small courtyard, re-entering by another, adjacent door leading down into the basement. Twenty-three steps – one for every year of Nicholas’s disastrous reign –now led him and his famliy to their collective fate. When everything was ready, Yurovsky ordered the Fiat truck across the road to be brought round to the house. The truck arrived, with the Ipatiev House’s ‘official driver’ Lyukhanov at the wheel. He gingerly backed the clumsy vehicle into the courtyard between the palisades, grinding its gears in the process, in order to ensure it could better pull away up the incline out of the house when fully loaded. As they watched, some of the guards might reasonably have wondered whether such a ramshackle vehicle was sturdy enough to carry 11 bodies and their escort out to the night-bound Koptyaki Forest. With the truck now outside and gunning its engine, and the killers gathering behind him outside the door, Yurovsky prepared to re-enter the storeroom. All was silent, except for the roar of the Fiat’s engine rattling the window panes. Yurovsky opened the double doors and entered. ‘Well here we all are’, said Nicholas, stepping forward to face Yurovsky, thinking that the truck they could hear revving outside had now arrived to take them to safety ‘What are you going to do now?’ His right hand clutching sweatily at the Colt in his trouser pocket, his left holding a piece of paper, Yurovsky asked the family to stand. Alexey, of course, could not and stayed where he was, as the Tsaritsa, muttering her complaints, struggled to her feet. Suddenly the room seemed to shrink in on him as Yurovsky stepped forward, brandishing his sheet of paper. It had been drafted by the presidium of the Ural Regional Soviet and given to him by Goloshchekin that day. Here, at last, was the commandant’s personal moment in history. Yurovsky had rehearsed his statement many times and raised his voice in order to be heard more clearly. ‘In view of the fact that your relatives in Europe continue their assault on Soviet Russia,’ he began portentously, gazing straight at Nicholas, ‘the presidium of the Ural Regional Soviet has sentenced you to be shot ...’ The Tsar registered blank incomprehension; turning his back to Yurovsky to face his family, he managed an incredulous stutter – ‘What? What?’ – as those around him were rooted to the spot in absolute terror. ‘So you’re not taking us anywhere?’ ventured Botkin, unable also to comprehend what had just been said. ‘I don’t understand. Read it again ...’ the Tsar interrupted, his face white with horror. Yurovsky picked up where he had left off: ‘... in view of the fact that the Czechoslovaks are threatening the red capital of the Urals – Ekaterinburg – and in view of the fact that the crowned executioner might escape the people’s court, the presidium of the Regional Soviet, fulfilling the will of the Revolution, has decreed that the former Tsar Nicholas Romanov, guilty of countless bloody crimes against the people, should be shot ...’  Instinctively, the Tsaritsa and Olga crossed themselves; a few incoherent words of shock or protest heard from the rest. Yurovsky, having finished reading the decree, pulled out his Colt, stepped forward and shot the Tsar at the point-blank range in the chest... » (Rappaport, 2008, p.185-189).
_______________________________________
© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2018. All rights reserved. 

§752 The Great War and Russian Revolution (1914-1918): IV-43.

IV-43 (§752):

The arms shall be heard to beat in the sky:
Even in that year the divine enemies
Shall want to thrash unjustly the holy laws
By thunderbolt and war good believers put to death.

(Seront oys au ciel les armes batre:
Celuy an mesme les divins ennemis
Voudront loix sainctes injustement debatre
Par foudre & guerre bien croyans à mort mis.)

NOTES: Batre: = battre; « batre: battre (to beat), frapper (to strike).» (Daele).

The arms shall be heard to beat in the sky: This kind of expressions are found four times in the Prophecies of Nostradamus, whose 3 cases (I-64, II-85 and III-11) are archaic after the fashion of Ovid, Metamorphoses, XV, 783 (cf. Brind’Amour, 1996, p.140), i.e. prefiguring some disasters to come, and the case under analysis is realistic, i.e. offering effective aerial battles (cf. Lamont, 1944, p.352: Aerial war), because the adverbial phrase ‘Even in that year’ announces the simultaneity of the aerial battles and the divine enemies’s thrash of the holy laws. And the aerial battles in its first appearance are characteristic of the First World War (1914-1918), as shown by the quatrain I-55 (§740): « .., air, sky shall be soiled,» where « air soiled » refers to the gas attacks and « sky soiled » to the aerial battles, both of these having been seen for the first time in the Great War: « Submarines and torpedoes had been prefigured in the American Civil War of 1860s, and the air dimension had already been entered by reconnaissance balloons in various conflicts. However, the First World War witnessed the first development of all these, plus airship and aeroplanes, as regular weapons of war. In this sense it was the first mechanized, three-dimensional war. Aircraft were also becoming amphibious, being designed with floats or special hulls to take off from, and land on, water.» (Chasseaud, 2013, p.188).

Debatre
: = battre en emphase (to beat hard, to thrash), the prefix ‘de-’ expressing
EMPHASIS (Ibuki, Suzuki); « Debatre. Agiter (to agitate), battre (to beat); Disputer (to dispute); Contredire (to deny), contester (to challenge).» (Huguet); « debatre, battre (to beat), frapper (to strike); contester (to challenge); débouter (to nonsuit); récuser (to impugn) » (Godefroy).

The holy laws
: = the Russian monarchy of the Romanovs devoted to the Orthodox Church. Cf. I-53 (§351): the holy law (French Catholicism); VI-23 (§346): holy laws (the French ancient regime imbued with Catholicism).

Even in that year (celuy an mesme): = In the year 1917, when is yet in progress the Great War and the Romanov reign is demolished.

Even in that year the divine enemies Shall want to thrash unjustly the holy laws: « He [Tsar Nicholas II] had assiduously maintained the autocratic rule of his father whilst blindly resisting all political innovation and condoning the suppression of the empire’s turbulent minorities. His stubborn belief in his role as God’s anointed representative [the holy laws] made him turn a blind eye to increasingly anxious calls for political change. But political and social unrest, funned by revolutionary activity among the urban workforces of St Petersburg and Moscow, had finally forced Nicholas into token gestures of constitutional reform in 1905. The democratic powers of the newly inaugurated Duma were, however, greatly circumscribed and Nicholas routinely subverted its activities, refusing any real concessions to representative government, and condemning moves to modernise, as he had since the day he ascended the throne, as mere ‘senseless dreams’. He retreated instead into domesticity; playing contentedly with his children, closeted away at the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoe Selo outside St Petersburg and seeing only a small circle of family and friesnds. Nicholas’s increasing invisibility from public view and his continuing resistance to reform rapidly set in motion the inexorable collapse of an already moribund political regime, despite a degree of economic recovery and growth in the years between 1907 and 1914. The process of collapse was accelerated after Russia’s enthusiastic entry into the First World War in August 1914. The initial euphoria of national solidarity, which Nicholas could and should have capitalised on politically, rapidly crumbled in the face of catastrophic losses. By September of the following year continuing gross ineptitude in both the conduct of the war and the supply of materiel, coupled with serious territorial losses to the Germans in Galicia, finally dragged Nicholas away from family preoccupations to assume supreme command at the front. But by now, despite the presence of its batyushka – ‘little father’ – at the head of the army, Russia was engaged in a war of attrition, fuelling unprecedented desertion rates in its demoralised, ill-equipped and starving peasant army. After centuries of unquestioning loyalty, the long-suffering conscript had begun to ask what he was fighting for. The Tsar, it seemed, only wanted him to plough, and fight, and pay taxes. And so Nicholas’s peasant army began deserting in their thousands. Back in Petrograd (as St Petersburg had been renamed in August 1914), Nicholas’s deeply unpopular wife, Alexandra, had been left in effective political control at a time when she was increasingly spellbound by Grigory Rasputin, the charismatic but hugely manipulative ‘holy man’ who had demonstrated an inexplicable ability to control her haemophiliac son Alexey’s attacks of bleeding. Alexandra’s intimacy with Rasputin had thrown her into hysterical conflict with government ministers and fuelled unbridled increasingly virulent gossip about the true nature of their relationship. Meanwhile Nicholas ignored the repeated and increasingly urgent warnings from members of his government about the escalating situation in Petrograd. He would not even listen to his devoted uncle, Grand Duke Nikolay, whom he had relieved of supreme command of the army, when the duke begged him to make compromises and save the dynasty from annihilation. The juggernaut of revolutionary change in Russia was now clearly unstoppable; politicians and foreign diplomats had been predicting it for years. Yet Nicholas stubbornly trusted only to his own counsel and that of his wife, a woman determined to protect the Romanovs’ absolute sovereignty, their divine right to rule [the holy laws], and with it the inheritance of their precious only son. Early in 1917, urban economic chaos in Petrograd finally triggered violent industrial strikes, marches and bread riots, bringing mutinous soldiers out on to the streets. The volatile situation erupted into outright revolution at the end of February. Away at the front, Nicholas believed he had no option but to abdicate ‘for the good of Russia’, the morale of the army and – most pressingly – the safety of his family. He had already been told by his ailing son’s doctors that Alexey was unlikely to live to the age of 16, so he took the decision simultaneously to abdicate on behalf of his heir.» (Rappaport, 2008, p.5-7); « By using the slogan ‘Peace, Land, Bread’, Bolshevik agitators [the divine enemies] were able to maximize their support from soldiers, urban workers and peasants. In the cold, short, dark days of early 1917, desperation was growing among Russians. In Petrograd (St Petersburg) bread riots, in which soldiers of the garrison joined, turned into revolution on 8 March. This challenge became a crisis when Cossaks refused to shoot at rioters. Four days later the Soviet (Council of Workers’ and Soldiers’ Deputies) was set up, which regarded itself as independent of the liberal opposition. The Soviet quietly planned to undermine the army and seize power. The Tsar, trying to return to Petrograd from his military headquarters, was stopped and turned back. On 15 March the liberals convinced the generals that the Tsar no longer had the support of the army and forced him to abdicate.» (Chasseaud, 2013, p.219).

Good believers (bien croyans): = « les orthodoxes (the orthodoxes) » (Brind’Amour, 1996, p.524) = the Tsar Nicholas II and his family: « Canonised by the Russian Orthodox church as ‘Holy Passion Bearers’, the Romanovs are immortalised in a host of modern-day icons on sale across Russia. The iconography of an idealised family has come full circle.» (Rappaport, 2008, between p.158 and p.159); « Sunday 14 July 1918. It was a beautiful bright Sunday morning as Father Ivan Storozhev, one of two resident priests at the Ekaterininsky Cathedral overlooking the River Iset, got out of bed to prepare for the Sunday liturgy. Suddenly he heard a loud knock at the door. He unlocked it to find himself confronted by one of the guards from the Ipatiev House. Father Storozhev was wanted up at the Ipatiev House that morning to conduct a liturgy for the Romanovs. Storozhev agreed that he would be at the house by 10 a.m. and immediately headed off to the cathedral to collect the things he needed for the service. It had been three weeks now since the Romanovs, a profoundly pious, church-going family, had been allowed a priest in to say mass for them. To be denied the ritual of the liturgy that was so much part of their everyday lives had been agony for the family – but they had kept each other buoyed up with continuous readings from the scriptures and other sacred works, for as Russians the spiritual life was as important to them as the physical. Exhausted by their present hardships, they took great strength in religious consolation and their mutual devotion to God; it helped them transcend the uncertainty of the dangerous and unstable world they now inhabited. Storozhev, who had given up a career as local public prosecutor to study for holy orders, himself had previously conducted a service – on 19 May. At that time, mid-May, Storozhev had been shocked at how pale, trasparent even, Alexey had appeared, so tall and thin and too sick to stand, but lying on his camp bed covered with a blanket. But there was light and life still in his darting eyes, which followed Storozhev’s every move with childish curiosity. Alexandra, despite appearing sickly and needing to frequently sit and rest in a chair, nevertheless looked ‘majestic’ – Storozhev could not deny it. She was dressed very simply, with no jewellery, but the Tsaritsa in her was still very apparent and she had taken an active part in the service. The Tsar, who had appeared calm and in good spirits, had been wearing military dress with the cross of St George pinned to his tunic. Storozhev had noticed that the four girls all had short hairs. The profound respect with which the family had bowed and acknowledged Storozhev as priest during the service had greatly impressed him, as too had the Tsar’s deep bass voice ringing out the responses behind him and the quiet fervency with which they had all recited the prayers.» (Rappaport, 2008, p.159-161).

By thunderbolt and war good believers put to death: The term « foudre (thunderbolt) is metaphorical and represents the suddenness and the powerfulness – the thundering character – of the attacks.» (Brind’Amour, id., p.525) and the phrase ‘by war’ signifies that the scene of shooting the Romanovs in the basement of Ipatiev House is as furious as if in a war; « Wendesday 17 July 1918. It was about 2.15 a.m. when Yurovsky and Nikulin, accompanied by two of the internal guard with rifles, led the family in the semi-darkness down the steep, narrow stairs to the ground floor... All was silent, except for the roar of the Fiat’s engine rattling the window panes. Yurovsky opened the double doors and entered. ‘Well here we all are’, said Nicholas, stepping forward to face Yurovsky, thinking that the truck they could hear revving outside had now arrived to take them to safety, ‘What are you going to do now?’ His right hand clutching sweatily at the Colt in his trouser pocket, his left holding a piece of paper, Yurovsky asked the family to stand. Alexey, of course, could not and stayed where he was, as the Tsaritsa, muttering her complaints, struggled to her feet. Suddenly the room seemed to shrink in on him as Yurovsky stepped forward, brandishing his sheet of paper. It had been drafted by the presidium of the Ural Regional Soviet and given to him by Goloshchekin that day. Here, at last, was the commandant’s personal moment in history. Yurovsky had rehearsed his statement many times and raised his voice in order to be heard more clearly. ‘In view of the fact that your relatives in Europe continue their assault on Soviet Russia,’ he began portentously, gazing straight at Nicholas, ‘the presidium of the Ural Regional Soviet has sentenced you to be shot ...’ The Tsar registered blank incomprehension; turning his back to Yurovsky to face his family, he managed an incredulous stutter – ‘What? What?’ – as those around him were rooted to the spot in absolute terror [By thunderbolt good believers put to death]. ‘So you’re not taking us anywhere?’ ventured Botkin, unable also to comprehend what had just been said. ‘I don’t understand. Read it again ...’ the Tsar interrupted, his face white with horror. Yurovsky picked up where he had left off: ‘... in view of the fact that the Czechoslovaks are threatening the red capital of the Urals – Ekaterinburg – and in view of the fact that the crowned executioner might escape the people’s court, the presidium of the Regional Soviet, fulfilling the will of the Revolution, has decreed that the former Tsar Nicholas Romanov, guilty of countless bloody crimes against the people, should be shot ...’ Instinctively, the Tsaritsa and Olga crossed themselves; a few incoherent words of shock or protest heard from the rest. Yurovsky, having finished reading the decree, pulled out his Colt, stepped forward and shot the Tsar at the point-blank range in the chest... » (Rappaport, 2008, p.185-189).

By war good believers put to death: « Yurovsky shot the Tsar at the point-blank range in the chest. Ermakov [the swaggering alcoholic], Kudrin [the factory mechanic and, as a dedicated Cheka man, a willing killer] and Medvedev [a 28-year-old welder from the Sysert works and senior guard at the Ipatiev House], not to be outdone and wanting their moment of personal revenge and glory too, immediately took aim and fired at Nicholas as well, followed by most of others, propelling an arc of blood and tissue over his terrified son beside him. For a moment the Tsar’s body quivered on the spot, his eyes fixated and wide, his chest cavities, ripped open by bullets, now frothing with oxygenated blood, his heart speeding up, all in a vain attempt to pump blood round his traumatised body. Then he quietly crumpled to the floor. But at least Nicholas was spared the sight of seeing what happened to his wife and family.» (Rappaport, id., p.189);

« For in that moment, Ermakov had turned and fired his Mauser at the Tsaritsa only six feet away from him as she tried to make the sign of the cross, hitting her in the left side of the skull, spraying brain tissue all around, as a hail of bullets from the other assassins hit her torso. Alexandra crumpled sideways on to the floor, her warm, sticky blood and brain tissue spreading across it in a mist of steam. Next to her, poor lame Alexey, too crippled even to get up and run, sat there transfixed, clutching in terror at his chair, his ashen face splattered with his father’s blood. The other victims meanwhile had fallen first to their knees and then to the floor in an instinctive attempt to protect themselves, some of them convulsing from the trauma of flesh wounds received from bullets aimed at the Tsar and Tsaritsa that had missed, others crawling in desperation in the impenetrable smoke, trying to find a way out. Trupp [footman] had gone down quickly, his legs shattered, and was finished off by a final shot to the head. Kharitonov [cook], his body riddled with bullets, crumpled to the floor and died beside him.» (Rappaport, id., p.189).

« Within minutes there was such chaos in the basement room that Yurovsky was forced to stop the shooting because of the choking conditions; he did so with great difficulty, for by now the men had been overtaken by the frenzy of getting the job done. The air was thick with a nauseating cocktail of blood and bodily fluids – the faeces, urine and vomit precipitated from bodies in moments of extreme trauma. The killers were all choking and coughing from the caustic smoke of burnt gunpowder as well as showers of dust from the plaster ceiling caused by the reverberation of bullets. Their eyes were streaming too and they were all temporarily deafened by the delayed noise of the gunshots. As Yurovsky’s men staggered from the storeroom, shaking and disorientated, to gasp at the cool night air, some of them vomited. But it wasn’t over. Once the deafening roar of firearms had ceased and the smoke had abated, the moans and whimpers they could hear inside made it all too apparent that they had botched the job. Many of their victims were still alive, horribly injured and suffering in agony. Dr Botkin had already been hit twice in the abdomen when a bullet aimed at his legs had shattered his kneecaps, knocking him to the ground. From here he had lifted himself up on his right elbow and tried to reach towards the Tsar in one final, protective act. Seeing Botkin was still alive as he re-entered the room, Yurovsky took aim with his Mauser and shot him in the left temple as the doctor turned his head away in terror. His wish had been fulfilled: he had, at least, been permitted to die with his Emperor.» (Rappaport, id., p.189-190).

« None of the Romanov girls – those pretty girls whom none of the guards had really wanted to have to kill – had died a quick or painless death. Maria had earlier been felled by a bullet in the thigh from Ermakov as she had pounded hysterically at the locked storeroom doors, and was now lying on the floor moaning. Her three sisters had suffered terribly, filling the room with their screams as they shrieked out for their mother, Olga and Tatiana doing what came instinctively, pressing themselves into each other’s arms in the darkest corner for protection. Realising that the two older girls were still alive, Ermakov lunged at them with the eight-inch bayonet he had stuffed in his belt, stabbing at their torsos. But, drunk and uncoordinated as he was, he had trouble penetrating the girls’ chests. It was the cool and collected Yurovsky who strode though the smoke and shot Tatiana in the back of the head as she struggled to her feet to escape his approach, the brains and blood from her shattered skull showering her hysterical sister. A wild-eyed Ermakov shot Olga through the jaw as she tried to rise to her feet too and run; in her death throes she fell across Tatiana’s body. Anastasia meanwhile had taken refuge near the wounded Maria. Realising that the two youngest girls were still cowering alive in the corner, Ermakov again resorted to his bayonet and stabbed Maria repeatedly in the torso, but his weapon would not go through and Yurovsky had to step over and deliver the coup de grȃce with a bullet to her head. Anastasia suffered horribly too: Ermakov lunged at her like a wild animal, again attempting to pierce her chest with his bayonet as he rained blows down on the helpless girl, before finally taking his gun to her head.» (Rappaport, id., p.190-191).

« Incredibly, Yurovsky now saw that the Tsarevich was still alive (for, as it later turned out, the boy too was wearing an undergarment sewn with jewels). He could not comprehend the sick boy’s ‘extraordinary vitality’ and watched in disbelief as a shaky Nikulin spent the entire clip of bullets from his Browning on him. But the fatally flawed blood of the haemophiliac boy still continued to pump round his body, keeping him alive when on so many occasions in the past it had nearly killed him. Yurovsky, having fired the last bullets from his Mauser, could do no better than Nikulin. Frenzied stabs by Ermakov with his bayonet again had little success at penetrating the layer of jewels surrounding the boy’s torso. In the end Yurovsky pulled a second gun, his Colt, from his belt to give the dying boy the coup de grȃce as he lay on the chair which had fallen sideways on to the floor. Alexey’s body then finally slumped and rolled silently against that of his father. Miraculously, the maid Demidova had somehow survived till now, wounded in the thigh, having fainted while those all around her were being put to death. When the shooting died down, she came to and staggered to her feet screaming, ‘Thank God, I am saved!’ Immediately Ermakov turned on her with his bayonet as Demidova found superhuman strength in the face of imminent death. She had been frightened of what the Bolsheviks at Ekaterinburg might do to them all; she had said so when she left Tobolsk. And now she resisted violently, turning this way and that, fending off bayonet thrusts with her reinforced cushions – the Tsaritsa’s jewels that she had so carefully protected now protecting her – until one of the assassins pulled them from her. In desperation Demidova made a final attempt to defend herself against the bayonet, hysterically swiping at it with her bare hands until she was finished off.» (Rappaport, id., p.191).

« Yurovsky had seen plenty of death and mutilation during his time as a medical orderly in the war. He had a stronger stomach for the grisly spectacle of the basement room [war] than most of the men there that night, and now the medical man in him took over as he went round checking pulses to make sure the victims were all dead. Ermakov meanwhile, his drunken brain reeling from this orgy of killing, staggered and stumbled and slipped as he crossed back and forth in the room, flailing at bodies with his bayonet, wreaking his personal hatred on the bullet-ridden bodies of the Tsar and Tsaritsa and cracking their rib cages. It had taken 20 minutes of increasingly frenzied activity to kill the Romanovs and their servants. Professional marksmen given the same task would have taken 30 seconds. What should have been a quick, clean execution had turned into a bloodbath [war].» (Rappaport, id., p.191-192).
_______________________________________
© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2018. All rights reserved.

§753 The Great War and Russian Revolution (2) (1914-1918): IX-55.

IX-55 (§753):

The horrible war that is ready in the Occident
In the following year shall come the plague,
So greatly horrible that the young the old and beasts,
Blood fire, Mercury, Mars, Jupiter in France.

(L'horrible guerre qu'en l'occident sapreste
L'an ensuivant viendra la pestilence,
Si fort horrible que jeune vieulx, ne beste,
Sang feu, Mercure, Mars, Jupiter en France.)

NOTES: Saprester: = S’aprrêter (to prepare, to get ready) (Dubois).

The horrible war that is ready in the Occident In the following year shall come the plague: « What a horrible war is approaching for the Occident of Europe! Thence shall come the Russian Revolution and the communism.» (Ionescu, 1976, p.384-385).

In the following year
(l’an ensuivant): = [The Russian Revolution shall come] In the year 1917 that follows the wartime years of 1914, 1915 and 1916. Ionescu’s interpretation: « Thence shall come (Il s’en ensuivra) » is not pertinent. 

The plague (la pestilence): « In general, the terms “pest”, “pestilence” or “pestiferous” are employed by Nostradamus as to the communism.» (Ionescu, id., p.383); « The terms such as “pest”, “pestilence” or “pestiferous” are always applied by the prophet to the communist revolutions and to their doctrine.» (Ionescu, id., p.384); « Nearly without exception, in the language of Nostradamus, the Latin word unda has the sense of revolution and the pest that of communism.» (Ionescu, id., p.428). His last concessive, not general nor categorical, explication as to the words pest, etc. is verified by the fact that he gives us 10 quatrains with these words, whose 6 (I-26, IX-55, III-19, VI-5, I-16 and II-6) are related to the communism (cf. Ionescu, 1976, p.214, p.217, p.255, p.428, p.511 and 1993, p.168 respectively) and 4 (VIII-17, VI-98, IV-30 and IV-48) to the other meanings such as the pesrsecution of the Christians in the French Revolution (Ionescu, 1976, p.287), the confusion of defeat in the Napoleonic wars (id., p.322), a lot of mischiefs (id., p.712) and a disease (id., p.245).

The plague (peste): According to our researches, this word, as well as the words pestilence, pestilent and pestifere (pestiferous), is figurative, non literal, for most of the expressions indicative of natural phenomena such as " earthquake, rain, tempest, dryness, inundation", etc. are not literal for Nostradamus, but figurative, describing metaphorically wars, revolts, social troubles, collective distress, etc., conditioned principally by human comportments (cf. Introduction §5). In fact, of 38 usages of the words « peste », « pestilence », « pestilent» and « pestifere », 32 are figurative for the warlike and social disasters and menaces, only 5 literal (II-19, II-37, II-46, II-53, II-65) and one for the real seism (VIII-84). And concerning the 32 metaphorical examples, the following concrete subdivisions are practicable:

1° 16th century: French Wars of Religion (III-56, VI-10, IX-82 and XI-91), Valois-Hapsburger Wars (VI-47 and VII-6), etc. (VIII-50 and IX-42).

2° 17th century: Montmorency’s revolt against Louis XIII in 1632 (VII-21).

3° 18th century: French Revolution (VIII-17, VIII-21 and IX-11), Spanish War of Succession (V-49).

4° Napoleonic Wars (I-52, II-32, II-56, IV-48, VI-46, VI-98 and VIII-62).

5° 19th century: Greek Independence Wars (V-90 and IX-91), Franco-Prussian War (III-75).

6° 20th century: Russian Revolution (VI-5 and IX-55), WWI (I-26 and I-55), WWII (III-84), Spanish Civil War (III-19), Rumanian Revolution in 1989 (II-6), etc. (I-16 and IV-30).

Of these 32 quatrains, only three (Russian and Rumanian Revolutions) are, we believe, proved to be related, as Ionescu pretends so to too much quatrains, to the communism.

Ne:
used as an expletive.

So greatly horrible that beasts, Blood fire:
= The horses of the cavalries to be suffered in the Great war; « The Western Front [in the Occident]. Germany declared war on France on 3 August [1914]. When German armies crossed the Belgian frontier on 4 August, Britain issued an immediate ultimatum to Germany, requiring her assurances that she would respect Belgian neutrality and, when that expired at midnight, was at war with Germany... Staff discussions between the British and French (Wilson-Foch scheme) had agreed that a small British Expeditionary Force (BEF) of six divisions would fight alongside the French. However the BEF eventually sent to France in August 1914 initially comprised only four divisions and a cavalry division, but these were soon augmented by two further infantry divisions. The first, crucial, action was the attack on the Belgian fortress of Liège, which barred the passage to the two German right wing armies. This assault started on 4 August and the fortress was finally taken on 16 August, using the secret weapons of ultra-heavy Krupp (German) and Skoda (Austrian) howitzers. The Liège forts destroyed and the citadel captured, the main advance began. Sordet’s French cavalry corps had reconnoitred the river Meuse into Belgium, starting on 6 August and approaching as close to nine miles to Liège. No trace of the German Army was found west of the Meuse, and this confirmed Joffre’s misguided view that Moltke would keep his armies east of the Meuse and, having only the limited strength of his first-line corps, would not extend his right wing west of the river. Joffre reckoned without the ability of the German reserve corps to march and fight with the active corps, which effectively doubled Moltke’s striking power.» (Chasseaud, 2013, p.36); « Joffre’s appreciation of the situation on 13 August was that the Germans were wheeling south, towards his Third, Fourth and Fifth Armies on the upper Meuse, not heading west, and that it was now too late for his armies to engage favourably beyond the Meuse. He therefore ordered them to be ready to counter-attack. Although he ignored Lanrezac’s (Fifth Army) view that the Germans were about to make a much wider wheel, he now felt concerned enough to send north the whole of the 1st Corps to oppose any German attempt to cross the Meuse between Givet and Namur. Two days later, when Richthofen’s Cavalry Corps attempted to cross the river near Dinant, the 1st Corps and Mangin’s 8th Brigade (which was specially tasked to support Sordet’s Corps) forced it to retire.» (id., p.44). Ionescu says that the verses: ‘So greatly horrible that the young the old and beasts, Blood fire’ refer, not to the WWI, but to the Russian Revolution (Ionescu, id., p.384-385), but they do not because beasts (horses) are usually not liable to be victims of revolutionay movements.

So greatly horrible that the young the old, Blood fire: = the victims of civilians in the Great War; « After Liège had fallen on 16 August, the full force of the German right wing was unleashed two days later into the area previously declared clear by Sordet. On the extreme right – or northern – flank, Kluck’s First Army stepped out on its gruelling 300-mile march, starting on an axis due west through Belgium, before swinging south into France. The schedule was to march for three weeks, averaging nearly fifteen miles a day, along roads that might be blocked by refugees, and this included any actions that might have to be fought on the way. Marching in the heat and dust along their allotted parallel roads, Kluck’s First and Bülow’s Second Armies pounded remorselessly to the west towards Brussels, forcing the Belgian field army to withdraw northwest into the entrenched protective ring of forts of the Antwerp defences. On 20 August Kluck’s Army, the extreme tip of the German wheel through Belgium, tramped into Brussels. The next day Bülow’s Army started to besiege the Namur fortress, with the great siege train of Krupp and Skoda howitzers now brought up from their success at Liège. The German Army was thorough in its intimidation of Belgian civilians, pursuing its doctrine of Schrecklichkeit (frightfulness) in taking and shooting hostages, and burning towns and villages to intimidate and deter.» (Chasseaud, 2013, p.44-45).

Mercury:
« Negotiations for an armistice.» (Ionescu, id., p.385.), Mercury sometimes being a messenger; « 1917 Nov: 26th, Soviets offer armistice to Germany and Austria; Dec: 5th, German and Rusian delegates sign armistice at Brest-Litovsk (where peace negotiations begin 21st).» (Williams, 1968, p.466.); « 1918 Mar: 3rd, peace treaty of Brest-Litovsk between Russia and Central Powers, and 7th, between Germany and Finland.» (id., p.468.).

Mars, Jupiter in France: The American Expeditionary Forces in France = « Jupiter with Mars
Kaldondon earthsalvation » (§747, VIII-48); « The final offensive shall be launched with the help of the Americans, and all shall finish in favour of France.» (Ionescu, id., p.385.); « Meanwhile American troops were being convoyed across the Atlantic in increasing numbers. Fifty thousand were arriving every week and being given extra training for battlefield conditions. On that day [27 May 1918] the Germans stormed through twelve miles on a forty-mile front, advancing over the Aisne and Vesle rivers to the Marne in three days, reaching a point only forty miles from Paris. American troops, part of the one-and-a-half-million-strong American Expeditionay Force already in France, helped to hold the Germans on the Marne.» (Chasseaud, 2013, p.263-264); « In the difficult Argonne Forest terrain of tangled woods, gullies and ridges, it was almost impossible for tanks to operate, and the Americans found themselves engaging in a bloody slog through a succession of strongly held German positions. By 1 October the French and Americans had advanced some ten miles and taken 18,000 prisoners, and in a few more miles came up against the strong defensive position of the Kriemhild Line. While their advance was painfully slow, they were at least holding down thirty-six German divisions.» (Chasseaud, id., p.269-271).
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Koji Nihei Daijyo

Author:Koji Nihei Daijyo
We have covered 143 quatrains (§588-§730) concerning the World Events in the 19th century after Napoleonic ages [1821-1900] in the Prophecies of Nostradamus, and 218 in the 20th [1901-2000] (§731-§948).

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