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§744 Emperor William II and the Western Front; Intervention of USA (1914-1918): IV-99.

IV-99 (§744):

The vallant first-born son of the daughter of the King,
Shall push back the French so deep,
That he shall spark lightnings, how
[the French] in such arrangements,
Those from USA a few and far at first, then deep into the fronts.

(L'aisné vaillant de la fille du Roy,
Respoulsera si profond les Celtiques:
Qu'il mettra fouldres, combien en tel arroy,
Peu & loing puis profond es Hesperiques.)

NOTES: V. Ionescu (1976, p.392-393) gives us an intelligent interpretation of the quatrain with the theme of the German Emperor William II (the eldest son of the daughter [Auguste Viktoria] of Queen Victoria [the King]) and the Western Front; Intervention of USA following the pertinent interpretation of the quatrain by Centurio (1953, p.109).

Arroy: « Arrangement, disposition; Suit, train; Military apparatus, armament, army.» (Huguet). Ionescu’s explanation of this term as “désarroi (disarray, disorder)” (Ionescu, 1976, p.270; p.392) following that of Le Pelletier (I, p.187) is not pertinent.

The vallant first-born son of the daughter of the King, Shall push back the French so deep, That he shall spark lightnings, how [the French] in such arrangements, Those from USA a few and far at first, then deep into the fronts: « The Great War. From the outset, the decisive area of conflict was Germany’s Western Front. The Germans invaded neutral Belgium and Luxembourg, overcoming Belgian resistance at Liege and Antwerp. French and British forces were driven into retreat southward after clashes at Mons and Charleroi. At the Marne, however, French commander General Joseph Joffre rallied his forces for a counter-offensive and the Germans were pushed back. After a desperate struggle at Ypres in autumn 1914, the rival armies dug into trenches that stretched from the North Sea to Switzerland. Massive resources were committed to offensives – by the Germans at Verdun and the Western Allies at the Somme – without breaking the stalemate. Up to 1918, only a voluntary withdrawal by the Germans to the fortified Hindenburg Line significantly changed the position of the armies. From March 1918 a series of large-scale German offensives broke through Allied defences and advanced the front line toward Paris [That he shall spark lightnings, how [the French] in such arrangements]. But, aided by the arrival of US troops, the Allies halted the Germans at the Marne. A successful British offensive at Amiens in August initiated the “Hundred Days”, a series of advances that pushed the fighting back close to the German border.» (
DKHistory, p.344).

« Meanwhile American troops were being convoyed across the Atlantic in increasing numbers. Fifty thousand were arriving every week and being given extra training for battlefield conditions [Those from USA a few and far at first]. On that day [27 May] the Germans stormed through twelve miles on a forty-mile front, advancing over the Aisne and Vesle rivers to the Marne in three days, reaching a point only forty miles from Paris. American troops, part of the one-and-a-half-million-strong American Expeditionay Force already in France, helped to hold the Germans on the Marne [Those from USA then deep into the fronts].» (Chasseaud, 2013, p.263-264).

« In the difficult Argonne Forest terrain of tangled woods, gullies and ridges, it was almost impossible for tanks to operate, and the Americans found themselves engaging in a bloody slog through a succession of strongly held German positions. By 1 October the French and Americans had advanced some ten miles and taken 18,000 prisoners, and in a few more miles came up against the strong defensive position of the Kriemhild Line. While their advance was painfully slow, they were at least holding down thirty-six German divisions.» (Chasseaud, id., p.269-271).
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Koji Nihei Daijyo

Author:Koji Nihei Daijyo
We have covered 143 quatrains (§588-§730) concerning the World Events in the 19th century after Napoleonic ages [1821-1900] in the Prophecies of Nostradamus, and 218 in the 20th [1901-2000] (§731-§948).

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