§667 - §671.

19th century: §667 - §671.

§667. Annexation of Venice; French occupation of Rome (1866-1867): IV-69.


IV-69:
The exiles shall hold the grand city,
The citizens dead, wounded and chased.
Those of Aquileia shall promise Parma
To declare their entry by means of unemployed processes.


(La cité grande les exilés tiendront,
Les citadins mors, meurtris & chassés:
Ceulx d'Aquilee à Parme promettront,
Monstrer l'entree par les lieux non trassés.)

Notes: The exiles: French expedition in Italy, exile meaning etymologically ‘ex-salire, to leap out’ (Obunsha), in this case to expedite out of the country;

The grand city: Rome;

Citizens: Italian volunteers following Garibaldi;

Those of Aquileia: The Venetians, Aquileia representing Venetia by synecdoche;

Parma: Representing the kingdom of Italy by synecdoche;

Their entry: Venetian annexation to the kingdom of Italy;

The exiles shall hold the grand city:The revolt of Garibaldi. The first announcement of the new proposals of the party of action was a proclamation from Garibaldi, published in July of 1867, which invited the Romans to rebel and the Italians to hold themselves in readiness to help him. The agitation once created, it was increased and fomented by every means; and as the waves rose the words of the great patriot became more ardent and violent. At Geneva at the council of peace, and at Balgirate before a maddened multitude the hero incited them against "the covey of vipers" which had made its nest at Rome; and on the 16th of September he published an address to Romans in which he promised them the aid of 100,000 youths “ who feared they were too many to share the miserable glory of expelling from Italy the mercenaries and jugglers.” The deeds followed the words. At Florence and other places secret preparations were made for an armed expedition into the Roman states and many young men were sent towards the frontier. What was the government doing meanwhile ? The words of the government were clear, but its deeds were obscure, and in fact the orders given by Rattazzi to the political authorities were so flaccid and vague that it would have been thought they were only a show, and that the minister secretly approved the designs of Garibaldi. What a difference between Cavour and Rattazzi ! With Cavour as an ally Garibaldi made an epic, with Rattazzi a double tragedy. Two ways were open to Rattazzi, either to act according to the decoration made in the official diary of the 2lst of September, or to act in the opposite way; sooner a war with France than a Mentana. He followed neither the one nor the other course but steered between the two, and brought fresh disaster upon his unhappy country. When Garibaldi left Florence for Arezzo, to assume command of the volunteers stationed on the borders, the government, which had let him go so far, removed him from command and had him taken to the fortress of Alessandria. But it did nothing to disperse the volunteers who had received from Garibaldi himself the word of command to prosecute the undertaking; and soon afterwards terrified at his ardour the government sent the prisoner free to Caprera, without even exacting a promise to remain quietly there, thinking it was suflicient guarantee to have the island watched by a few warships. Meanwhile a band of Garibaldians of about 200 men entered Viterbo and there instituted a provisionary government under the name of “committee of insurrection.” At tbe same time two other companies passed the frontier. But grave news arrived at that time from France. The French journals announced that preparations for a fresh Roman expedition were at the port of Toulon, and following this announcement (October 19th) from the government saying that France would intervene with her forces if the Italian government did not put a stop to the Garibaldian movement. And whilst the government was discussing the course to take in such a contingency the news came that Garibaldi had fled from Caprera. It was the coup de grace of the minister Rattazzi. The same evening that Graribaldi arrived at Florence he sent in his resignation, and the king deputed Cialdini to form a new ministry (October 20th). Now followed the strange events which showed the embarrassment of the government. On one side it strove by means of the marquis Pepoli to persuade the emperor Napoleon that it was strong enough to suppress the Garibaldian movement; and on the other it let Garibaldi speak in public, stir the people, and go to Terni to head the movement raised by him. The central committee of Florence became a true war committee, although it continued to call itself one of succour, and it announced to all Italy in its proclamation of the 22nd of October that the insurrection had broke out in Rome. But the news was not true. The reported Roman insurrection consisted in an attempt at rebellion by a hundred youths led by Cairoli, which not being seconded by the people, was easily quelled. The misfortune of the first attempt did not quench the ardour of the patriots nor temper the audacity of the leaders of the enterprise. A victory gained October 25th by Garibaldi at Monterotondo over the papal troops fomented the enthusiasm of the insurgent youths so that they feared no danger, nor were they checked by any obstacle... The Châssepots had conquered; the compact of September was destroyed; Rome was once more in the hands of the French [October 30th, 1867], and Turin wept for a sacrifice which had been in vain. The royal troops commanded by Cadorna remained in the pontifical territories, but the French minister having protested against this occupation, the government, not wishing further to aggravate an already strained situation, ordered them to be recalled and the king took advantage of this act of abnegation to send a letter to the emperor Napoleon in which he conjured him, in the interest of the Napoleonic dynasty, to break definitely with the clerical party and order the immediate recall of the troops from Rome. But Napoleon III was deaf to this advice, which was nevertheless wise; he would not break the hybrid union with the clerical party, and reaped from it, as recompense, the union in the same grave of the papal monarchy and the Napoleonic empire. The answer to Pepoli's letter was given by the French minister of foreign affairs, Rouher, the faithful executor and interpreter of his masters' policy. In the discussion which took place in the legislative assembly on the new expedition to Rome, this minister said that the Italians had “never had Rome.” “We will show him his ‘Never (jamais)’,” exclaimed Victor Emmanuel in good Piedmontese, and he was not satisfied until the petulant minister had apologised for the unfortunate word, saying it had escaped him in the heat of an impromptu speech. The king asked the same Menabrea to form a new ministry under his presidency.” (HH, IX, p.617-619)

The citizens dead, wounded and chased: Mentana. The dangers and obstacles increased immeasurably. After long vacillation the emperor seeing the impotence of the Italian government to end the Garibaldian invasion had determined on French intervention in the Roman state. Cialdini's attempt having failed, the king committed to General Menebrea the task of forming a new administration. The new ministry made known its intentions in a royal proclamation dated October 27th, in which it repudiated the flag raised in the papal states, and invited the volunteers to enlist at once in the royal army. This proclamation aimed at a double result, the crushing of the Garibaldian invasion and the prevention of French intervention. But neither the one nor the other was achieved. When the Italian government learned that the French had disembarked at Civitavecchia, they then decided to intervene and the royal troops occupied several places in the pontifical states. Although resolved to intervene, the government thought it well to offer to Garibaldi an opportunity of retiring with honour from an enterprise which, in the present state of affairs, could not be carried on without useless bloodshed and the exposing of the country to grave peril. But Garibaldi, far from accepting this anchor salvation, as soon as he knew that the French had landed at Civitavecchia issued a proclamation to his followers encouraging them to remain in the struggle and inviting them to unite with him at Tivoli so that the unification of the country might be compassed by some means (October 31st). The volunteer column had scarcely passed Mentana when Garibaldi received the news of a vigorous attack on his vanguard by the papal zouaves. Hearing this the general returned to Mentana to avoid his left flank turned and endeavoured to keep in his rear the rest of the troops that were in the district (November 3rd). He did not go far before the enemy appeared. Repulsed at the first attack, they shortly returned with formidable reinforcements among which were 1,500 Frenchmen. The volunteers could ill stand against an enemy so superior in numbers and armed with good weapons. The châssepots did horrible execution. Garibaldi ordered a retreat, took leave of his followers, and, having taken steps for disbanding the volunteer corps, he recrossed the frontier. The Italian government ignorant of his intentions had him arrested and kept in custody until the excitement had calmed down.” (HH, IX, p.618-619)

Those of Aquileia shall promise Parma To declare their entry by means of unemployed processes: The war of 1866 and Annexation of Venice. Italy still looked with hungry eyes at the rich Venetian territory which still remained to Austria. In 1866 Prussia and Austria fell into disputes which culminated in war. In March, Prussia was glad to secure the alliance of Italy, promising to continue war until Austria gave up to Italy the whole mainland of Venice except the city itself and the quadrilateral of fortresses. June 20th Italy declared war on Austria, which sent an army of 180,000 into the peninsula, and 27 ships. Against these Italy raised 800,000 men as well as a fleet of 36 vessels. The quadrilateral, however, gave the Austrians an excellent base, as Bertolini says, as well as a formidable bulwark. The Italians lacked strategists, and though the king and Prince Humbert [Umberto] led them, they met with no success. March 24th they were surprised with loss, and at Custozza where, according to Bertolini, they had only 62,000 men to the Austrians' 75,000, they fought a drawn battle, but retreated after a loss of 3,000 men and 4,000 prisoners. Garibaldi's volunteers, after some slight success at Monte Suello July 3rd, were surprised and completely routed at Vezza, July 5th. He retrieved his fortunes, however, at Ampola (July 16th-19th), Bezzea and Lardaro (July 21st), when word came of an armistice. The navy was also badly defeated at Lissa, July 17th. Admiral Persano on July 18th bombarded the Austrian shore batteries, but although he succeeded in temporarily silencing most of the guns he was unable to effect a landing. Two days later the Austrian fleet appeared in the harbour and at once gave battle to the Italian fleet. In this fight the Italian admiral seems to have lost his head completely, and to have given either conflicting orders, or no orders at all. The result was a complete victory for the Austrians. The Prussians had, however, gone from victory to victory, finally reaching the triumph of Sadowa, or Königgrätz, July 5th. Austria in despair and in need of troops made Napoleon III a present of Venetia. The Italians felt it an “ignominy” to accept Venetia as a gift from the French, but finally terms were agreed upon with Austria direct, by which Italy received all the Venetian provinces and the Iron Crown of the Lombards, the freedom of service of all Lombards in the Austrian army. Italy assumed the Lombardo-Venetian debt of 64,000,000 francs and agreed to pay 35,000,000 francs to Austria. October 19th, 1866, the Italian flag was hoisted on St-Mark's. A plebiscite was taken and 647,384 citizens voted for the union under the constitutional monarchy of Victor Emmanuel, while only 69 voted against it. November 7th Victor Emmanuel made his formal entry into Venice amidst great enthusiasm.” (HH, IX, p.614-615)

§668. Napoleon III, twice protector of the Pope (1849; 1867): VII-5.

VII-5:
The wine on the table shall be spread thence,
The third estate shall not have the table he pretended to prepare:
Twice Perugia, descendant of the king of Parma,
Shall do what he conceived against Pisa.


(Vin sur la table en sera espandu,
Le tiers, n'aura celle qu'il pretendoit:
Deux fois du noir de Parme descendu,
Perouse à Pize fera ce qu'il cuidoit.)

Notes: Noir: An anagram of ROY, King (Torné-Chavigny, 1861, p.13);

The King of Parma: « Napoleon I, King of Italy and husband of Marie-Louise, later duchess of Parma » (Vignois, 1910, p.391);

Descendant of the King of Parma: Napoleon III (Vignois,id.);

Perouse: As in apposition to the “descendant of the king of Parma”, it signifies Napoleon III in behalf of the Pope, Perugia having been a pontifical estate;

Against Pisa: Against the Italian revolutionaries, Pize or Pise having the sense of pis (worse), pire (worse) (Vignois,id.);

The table he pretended to prepare: « That war between Sardinia and Austria was merely a question of time became apparent to everyone toward the end of the fifties. Fortunately for Sardinia, Austria's position was an isolated one owing to the enmity which her attitude during the Crimean War had won for her from Russia, and her inborn jealousy and distrust of Prussia. It was not long before Russian men-of-war were to be seen in the Mediterranean, and Napoleon's efforts on behalf of France were no less successful. The cautious emperor Napoleon might not have been so ready to champion the weaker side had it not been for the attempt on his life made by Orsini. The emperor had once held close relations with the Italian patriots, had even been a member of an Italian secret society, and now [Jan. 1858], regarded by his former associates as a traitor to their cause, he was condemned by them to death.» (HH, IX, p.603)

Twice: 1°« [July 2, 1849]. A matter concerning a foreign nation had caused the latter conflict. The European revolutions, to which the revolution of February had given birth, had been promptly put down by the kings whom they had alarmed. Already Austria, victorious in Hungary, thanks to the Russians, had defeated the king of Sardinia, Charles Albert, at Novara; and Lombardy had again fallen into its power. The republic proclaimed at Rome, after the flight of the pope, vainly endeavoured to make the walls of the Holy City the last rampart of the independence of the peninsula. Victorious for an instant, six months before, Italy had refused the aid of France; now that she was vanquished and threatened by a heavier yoke, policy, and the solicitations of the Catholics who were then dominant in the chamber and the ministry, made it a duty of the government to protect the Italian peninsula and the holy see against the revolutionaries who wished to suppress the pope's temporal royalty. An army commanded by General Oudinot was sent into Italy to restore Rome to the pontiff. The republicans of Paris endeavoured by an insurrection to save the republic of Rome. A member of the former provisional government, Ledru-Rollin was with them. On the 13th of June, 1849, a timely display of troops nipped the rising in the bud. This riot cost the party its leaders, who were condemned by the high court of Versailles, and the Romans their last hope. On the 2nd of July General Oudinot, after showing the utmost discretion in the siege of the place, entered Rome, where the pope was reinstated. The legislative assembly, which had succeeded the constituent assembly, May 28th, 1849, although less unanimous on this question, nevertheless approved the president's conduct and it was decided that the troops should remain in Rome for the protection of the pope. From that day France had one arm occupied in Italy.» (HH, XIII, p.112-113);

2°« [Oct. 30, 1867]. The reported Roman insurrection consisted in an attempt at rebellion by a hundred youths led by Cairoli, which not being seconded by the people, was easily quelled. The misfortune of the first attempt did not quench the ardour of the patriots nor temper the audacity of the leaders of the enterprise. A victory gained October 25th by Garibaldi at Monterotondo over the papal troops fomented the enthusiasm of the insurgent youths so that they feared no danger, nor were they checked by any obstacle... The Châssepots had conquered; the compact of September was destroyed; Rome was once more in the hands of the French, and Turin wept for a sacrifice which had been in vain. The royal troops commanded by Cadorna remained in the pontifical territories, but the French minister having protested against this occupation, the government, not wishing further to aggravate an already strained situation, ordered them to be recalled » (HH, IX, p.619);

§669. Napoleon III allied to the King of Sardinia, friend of Garibaldi (1858-1868): VIII-44.

VIII-44:
The reproduced disposition of Ogmion,
Shall deviate, in the 7th to 9th year of his route,
Toward a king of long line and friendly with a half-human.
The fort of Pau in Navarre forced to prostrate itself.


(Le procree naturel dogmion,
De sept à neuf du chemin destorner
A roy de longue & amy aumi hom,
Doit à Navarre fort de PAV prosterner.)

Notes: Procree: Reproduced. Cf. « Procreative, s.f. faculté de reproduire (faculty to reproduce); Procreeur, s.m. père (father)» (Godefroy);

Dogmion: De + Ogmion (Of + Ogmion). Ogmion: Being derived from Ogmios (a Greco-Roman god presiding over eloquence with the power of winning a mass of people - cf. Torné-Chavigny,1860, p.61), represents Napoleon III. Cf. §625,IX-89: Ognyon, with a substitution of m by n; The young ognyon = Louis-Napoleon, nephew of Napoleon I, being elected president of the French republic in 1848 in appealing to the nation as his uncle did. N and on of ognyon suggest Napoleon;

The reproduced disposition of Ogmion: The disposition of Napoleon III reproducing that of his uncle Napoleon I, i.e., the strong interest in the affairs of Italy;

De sept à neuf du chemin: In the 7th to 9th year of his route of the Second Empire starting in 1852, i.e. in 1858, 1859 and 1860 (cf. Torné-Chavigny, 1860, p.78);

Destorner à: Se détourner à, To deviate toward. Nostradamus often employs pronominal verbs without personal pronouns (e.g. VIII-45: [se] porter; IV-90: [se] joindre);

Roy de longue: Roy d’une longue race (A king of the long line). « The family of Savoy is the oldest of the sovereign houses of Europe after that of France» (Torné-Chavigny, id., p.79);

Amy: A friend in apposition to, or qualifying, a king, for the king of Sardinia made the best use of the revolutionary Garibaldi, while the emperor of France checked the extremist Garibaldi. Only Larmor (1925, p.258) achieved this solution;

Aumi hom: à + le + mihom. Mi is for half, midway (id.,p.78). Hom is for homme (man, human) (id.); « hom, cas suj. sg. d’home; home, cas sujet sg. (homo); sm.: homme.» (Daele);

Le mihom: The half-human representing an atheistic revolutionary Garibaldi, who is denounced by Nostradamus, Catholic apologist, in terms of severity: « le pourceau demy-homme, the half-human pig » (§689,I-64), « le viellard nay au demi pourceau, the old man born to half-pig» (§688,III-69), « monstre vapin, rascal monster» (§665,V-20), etc.;

Napoleon III allied to the King of Sardinia in 1858,1859 and 1860: « On the 13th of March [1858] Orsini and Fieri perished on the scaffold, the two remaining accomplices having been deported to America. The courage with which Orsini met death, and the love of country he manifested up to his last breath aroused universal sympathy. What Orsini living had failed to bring about, he accomplished dead. While the murderous attempt was made the pretext for robbing France of all freedom by means of the security law of the 28th of January, Napoleon in conjunction with Cavour — who with artful smoothness calmed his imperial associate's anger toward Italy, the hotbed of conspiracies — proceeded to carry out the wishes of Orsini. Several weeks later Cavour held a secret conference with Napoleon at which plans regarding Italy were perfected. “ Italy to be free as far as Adria; the whole of upper Italy to be united in a kingdom, France to be enlarged by the annexation of Savoy,” these were the terms agreed upon in the interview. It was further proposed that the bond between the two reigning houses should be made still firmer by the betrothal of Prince Napoleon Bonaparte with Clotilde, the daughter of Victor Emmanuel.» (HH, IX, p.603)

« In 1859 war was brought close in sight by Victor Emmanuel’s announcement at the opening of the chamber of deputies in Turin that Sardinia could no longer remain insensible to the cries for help that were arising on all sides. Austria proceeded at once to strengthen her army, to place the whole of Lombardy under martial law, and by every means possible sought to secure her power and possessions in Italy. Austria was severely blamed by the neutral powers for beginning hostilities, and it seemed as though with the death of Field Marshal Radetzky Austria's military star had set forever. By shameful inactivity the Austrians allowed the Sardinians time to concentrate their 80,000 men around the fortress of Alessandria, where they were joined in May by several divisions of French troops, Garibaldi, meanwhile, with his “ Alpine hunters ” guarding the foot of the mountain whence he could harass the right wing of the Austrians and support the operations of the main army. The popularity of his name drew volunteers in flocks, and his appearance in the northern lake-region aroused the wildest enthusiasm among the people. About the middle of May Napoleon himself arrived in Italy; although he left the actual lead to experienced generals, he took his place at the head of the troops.» (HH, IX, p.603-604). « At last in March, 1860, the popular vote was obtained which gave Savoy and Nice to France and made Tuscany, Parma, Modena, and the Roman legations a part of the kingdom of Sardinia.» (HH, IX, p.607);

The fort of Pau in Navarre forced to prostrate itself: « Napoleon III contributed to the fall of Isabella, scarecely recommendable queen of Spain, a country where one finds a province of Navarre, and he settled her for a moment in the castle of Pau, where had been born Henry IV.» (Vignois,1910,p.249). « In July, 1868, a great military revolt was to break out. The minister caused the most important generals, among them Serrano and Dulce, to be deported to the Canary Isles, and even banished from Spain the queen's brother-in-law, the duke of Montpensier, whose name seemed to serve as a watchword for the revolution. Excitement increased in the land. Isabella thought herself compelled to enter into closer relations than hitherto with her friend and ally, as she called Napoleon III, and arranged an interview with him for the 18th and 19th of September in the two frontier posts Biarritz and San Sebastian, Napoleon was accredited with the plan of recalling his troops from Rome and filling their places with Spanish soldiers in the event of his beginning his long-threatened war with Germany. Isabella, who had just been honoured by receiving the Golden Rose of the Faith and Virtue from the pope, was very much in favour of such a project. But at the very moment when the Franco-Spanish alliance was to have been concluded and their majesties were at their appointed posts, rebellion broke out in Cadiz. It was the 18th of September. The banished generals Serrano and Prim returned, the rear-admiral Topete joined them with the whole fleet, the few faithful troops were conquered by Serrano on September 28th, near Alcolea. All the larger cities, even Madrid, took sides with the revolution with the cry, "Down with the Bourbons! down with the Jesuits! " on the 29th; and so there was nothing left for Isabella but to leave San Sebastian the next day and to take refuge on French soil. She at once took up her residence at Pau whence she uttered a passionate but unavailing protest against her exile. When she realised that all hope of restoration, for the present, was gone, she went to Paris, where she died in 1902.» (HH, X, p.402).

§670. Italian civil war; Evacuation of Rome by the French troops (1859-1870): IV-78.

IV-78:
The grand army of the civil war,
So that Parma found in the hands of strangeness without notice.
Seventy-nine depressed inside the city,
The foreigners with sword shall go away all of them.


(La grand armee de la pugne civille,
Pour de nuict Parme à l'estrange trouvee
Septanteneuf meurtris dedans la ville,
Les estrangers passez tous à l'espee.)

Notes: The grand army of the civil war: « In 1859 war was brought close in sight by Victor Emmanuel’s announcement at the opening of the chamber of deputies in Turin that Sardinia could no longer remain insensible to the cries for help that were arising on all sides... By shameful inactivity the Austrians allowed the Sardinians time to concentrate their 80,000 men around the fortress of Alessandria, where they were joined in May by several divisions of French troops, Garibaldi, meanwhile, with his “ Alpine hunters ” guarding the foot of the mountain whence he could harass the right wing of the Austrians and support the operations of the main army. The popularity of his name drew volunteers in flocks, and his appearance in the northern lake-region aroused the wildest enthusiasm among the people. About the middle of May Napoleon himself arrived in Italy; although he left the actual lead to experienced generals, he took his place at the head of the troops.» (HH, IX, p.603-604).

So that Parma found in the hands of strangeness without notice: « Unionist enthusiasm had already burned too high, however, for political or diplomatic schemes to avail against it. All over the land the flag of united Italy was raised, and conjunction demanded with Sardinia. Bologna declared itself free from the pope and invoked the dictatorship of the king of Sardinia. Many other cities of the pontifical state followed this example, indeed the greater part of the pontifical possessions would have fallen away from Rome had not the terrible storming of Perugia by the pope's Swiss guard spread such dismay that Ancona, Ferara, and Ravenna for a while remained true... At last in March, 1860, the popular vote was obtained which gave Savoy and Nice to France and made Tuscany, Parma, Modena, and the Roman legations a part of the kingdom of Sardinia [in the hands of strangeness]. The pope excommunicated all who had taken part or even connived at this despoliation of Rome [de nuit, clandestinely, without notice]; but the papal bull, once so formidable a weapon, had in the course of time lost much of its early terrors.» (HH, IX, p.604-610)

Seventy-nine depressed inside the city: « The Prussians had, however, gone from victory to victory, finally reaching the triumph of Sadowa, or Königgrätz, July 5th. Austria in despair and in need of troops made Napoleon III a present of Venetia. The Italians felt it an “ignominy” to accept Venetia as a gift from the French, but finally terms were agreed upon with Austria direct, by which Italy received all the Venetian provinces and the Iron Crown of the Lombards, the freedom of service of all Lombards in the Austrian army. Italy assumed the Lombardo-Venetian debt of 64,000,000 francs and agreed to pay 35,000,000 francs to Austria. October 19th, 1866, the Italian flag was hoisted on St-Mark's. A plebiscite was taken and 647,384 citizens voted for the union under the constitutional monarchy of Victor Emmanuel, while only 69 voted against it [the number of 79 is apparently for 69 in favour of poetic expression featuring the sacred number 7. Cf. §668,VIII-44: De sept à neuf, from seven to nine]. November 7th [7 !] Victor Emmanuel made his formal entry into Venice amidst great enthusiasm.» (HH, IX, p.614-615)

The foreigners with sword shall go away all of them: « The Roman question renewed. While parliament was occupied with the financial question, the minister, Menabrea, was working to induce the French government to put in force again the September convention, and to recall her troops from Rome. The Italian minister offered to guarantee to the pope perfect liberty for the exercise of his spiritual power, and to assume for Italy a considerable pay of the pontifical debt. In guarantee of the serious nature of his offer, he pointed to the elements of the authority to be henceforth recognised in the kingdom, which would lead to the disappearance of all traces of agitation and to the closing forever of the era of factious revolutions, of conspiracies and of individual initiative. But the French government did not share the rose-coloured visions of the Italian minister, and brought forward information proving the existence of Mazzinian workings in the peninsula. Menabrea seeing there was nothing more to do, resigned his diplomatic position in the chamber of deputies at the end of March, 1869. » (HH, IX, p.620)

« No better effect resulted from another much more important attempt made this time by the king, Victor Emmanuel. Moved by the desire of re-establishing with Napoleon III the friendly relations interrupted by th events of 1867, and of assuring the preservation of peace in Europe, which the strained relations existing between France and Prussia threatened to disturb, he took the initiative of proposing a triple alliance between Italy, France, and Austria, of which the fundamental condition was the evacuation of Rome by the French troops, and the formal recognition of the principle of non-intervention in Italian affairs. The three contracting powers would then have acted together in all important questions of European politics, guaranteeing reciprocally the integrity of their respective territories and not taking any resolution of general importance without the consent of all. But neither the persuasions of the emperor of Austria nor those of his cousin Prince Jerome, were able to influence Napoleon's decision. He held firm to his refusal with regard to the evacuation of Rome, and as this was the fundamental, the whole plan was abortive, and this on the eve of the Franco-Prussian War.» (HH, IX, id.)

« The agitation by which the country was disturbed in 1869, was the work of the Mazzinians. Mazzini had proclaimed from London, “ Italy must free herself from a monarchy, since it has shown that it will not and cannot give to Italy, either unity, independence, or liberty.” And the disciples of the prophet speedily translated the republican words into action, raising tumults and discussions in all the principal cities of Italy. As we have seen, the French government had given warning of the Mazzinian sect, deriving fron thence a reason for refusing the evacuation of Rome by the French troops. The Mazzinians, to insure success, had endeavoured to corrupt the army, especially making their insidious advances to inferior officers. A few allowed themselves to be drawn into the trap and expiated their perjury with their lives. The case of Corporal Barsanti aroused general interest. He was a young man of twenty, the support and hope of his aged parents, but the minister of war Govone declared that if the army were not to be demoralised an example must be made, and Barsanti was shot August 27th, 1870, in the neighbourhood of Milan. A few days before this execution Mazzini by Govone's orders had been arrested in Milan and brought under a strong guard to the fortress of Gaeta. With the removal of the chief, the republican agitation died away to give place to another and a very different one, which was that of the restoration of Rome to Italy and the final fall of the pope's temporal power. The ministry of Lanza and Sella found itself from its birth face to face with extraordinary circumstances, demanding the greatest secrecy on the part of the Italian government if dangers and misfortunes were to be averted from the state. The convocation of the Vatican council was fixed for December 8th, 1869. In the speech from the crown, Victor Emmanuel had expressed the hope that from this assembly would issue some expression conciliating faith and science, religion and civil life. The assembly proclaimed instead the dogma of papal infallibility, thus setting the seal to the antithesis between church and state. As with the preceding ministry so with the new; the financial question was their principal care. The Franco-Prussian War broke out about the middle of July, 1870. The ruin of the Napoleonic principality in 1870 removed half of the obstacles which had hitherto prevented Italy from solving the Roman question in a manner conformable to national interests. At the first French reverses the imperial government had recalled the garrison from Rome, declaring that they trusted to their loyalty for the faithful observance of the convention of September 15th. This was a strange appeal to the loyalty of the Italian government regarding what had been so disloyally set aside by the imperial government. However, the minister Lanza kept faithfully to the convention, impelled by a sentiment of noble honesty, so that it might not seem that Italy had taken advantage of the powerlessness caused by the defeats sustained by her ancient ally, to lay hands upon Rome.» (HH, IX, p.620-621)

§671. Italian unification of Rome; Defeat of Napoleon III in Alsace-Lorraine (1870): VIII-11.

VIII-11:
The innumerable people shall appear in Vicentia,
The fire without strength shall burn the Basilica.
Near Lunage the great of Valence defeated,
When Venice shall take arms in the center.


(Peuple infiny apparoistra à Vicence
Sans force feu brusler la Basilique
Pres de Lunage deffait grand de Valence,
Lors que Venise par more prendra pique.)

Notes: The innumerable people shall appear in Vicentia: In Vicentia, i.e. in North Italy, for there has appeared the kingdom of Italy absorbing Venetia in 1866;

The fire without strength shall burn the Basilica: Even a slightest fire burns down the Vatican. « ... caused by the defeats sustained by her ancient ally, to lay hands upon Rome... But when the empire fell and was succeeded by a republic all causes for scruples vanished and the duty of the government to settle the Roman question for the good of the nation could no longer be delayed. In vain had Victor Emmanuel sent his envoy to Rome with an autograph letter in which he appealed to the heart of the pope “ with the affection of a son, the loyalty of a king, and the soul of an Italian,” that he would permit the royal troops, already posted in the outskirts of Rome, to enter and occupy such positions in the Roman territory as was necessary for the maintenance of order and the safe-guarding of the pontiff. Pius IX held firmly to his refusal, saying he would yield to force but not to injustice. Then it was necessary to resort to force. The government gave orders to General Raffaele Cadorna to pass the borders with his troops, at the same time informing the European governments, by means of a circular letter, of the resolution taken and justifying its action by pointing out the impossibility of reconciling Italy with papal Rome and the necessity of procuring peace and security for Italy. The note then reassured the powers as to the steps Italy would take for the safeguard of the pope's spiritual power so that his liberty and independence might be complete. On September 11th Cadorna entered the pontifical territories. On the 17th the Italian soldiers were at Civitavecchia, and on the 19th under the walls of Rome. » (HH, IX, p.621-622)

« But Pius IX had determined on his course of conduct and was resolved to pursue it at any cost. His views were expressed in his letter written September 19th to General Kanzler, the commander-in-chief of the papal force. In it Pius IX ordered Kanzler to treat with the enemy on the slightest breach of the walls of Rome “as the defence was solely to be suffcient to serve as proof of an act of violence and nothing more.” And so it happened; at half-past five on the morning of September 21st the Italian soldiers opened fire between the Pia and the Sorlara gates and at the gate of St. John and St. Pancras, and hardly was a breach made when the papal troops ceased fire and hoisted the white flag on all the batteries . A messenger was sent to Cadorna and it was speedily agreed that Rome should surrender all but the Leonine city, whicn should for the present remain under the jurisdiction of the pope. Then the papal troops were awarded the honours of war, but were obliged to lay down arms and flags. The peasant soldiers were sent back to their homes and all foreigners despatched to their respective countries at the expense of the Italian government. » (HH, IX, p.622)

Lunage: An enigma, whose “Lune-” can suggest French place-names such as Luneau, Lunegarde, Lunel, Lunel-Viel, Luneray, Lunery or Lunéville and this last “Lunéville”, unique in France, may be that which indicates the principal battle-fields of Franco-Prussian war in 1870, where the French has been defeated;

The great of Valence: Napoleon III, Valence representing France by synecdoche;

Near Lunage the great of Valence defeated: In fact, the French was defeated in Wissenburg (August 4), in Spicheren (Aug. 5), in Frœschwiller (Aug. 6), in Forbach (Aug. 6), in Mars-la-Tour and Gravelotte (Aug. 16), in St. Privat-la-Montagne (Aug. 18), and capitulated in Sedan (Sept. 2) and in Metz (Oct. 27), all these places almost in a semicircle being “near Lunéville” as its center (cf. Seignobos, 1921b, p.230-242; HH, XIII, p.150-156; GeoCenter, Euro Atlas France, p.38-40), and the whole theater of war in Alsace-Lorraine can be described as a ‘crescent (croissant)’ of the moon (Lune) [luna in Latin] (cf. PenguinAtlas 2, p.70);

More: = Meure, Milieu (center) (Godefroy) and at the same time a perfect anagram of Rome. The variant ‘mort, death’ (Vignois, 1910, p.273) or ‘morte, death, dead’ (Leoni, 1961, p.350; Fontbrune, 1980, p.143; Luni, 1998, p.306) is scarcely valid. Another example of ‘More’ with ‘Chameau (camel)’ (§602,IV-85) means ‘the Moor’ and ‘la loy Moricque (the Moorish law)’ (§759,III-95) means ‘the Moor’s law, i.e. the Ottoman Empire’;

When Venice [the kingdom of Italy, by synecdoche] shall take arms in the center [in Rome] = The fire without strength shall burn the Basilica.

La Basilique: = Basilica di San Pietro in Vaticano, la basilique Saint-Pierre, St. Peter’s Basilica, ‘la Basilique’ with the initial capital excluding the option of interpretation ‘a royal palace’ by Vignois (1910, p.273) and Fontbrune (1980, p.143). Moreover, another usage ‘Basil grand, a grand Basil’ (§52,VI-78) means the Pope Pius IV. There is no other example as to ‘basilique’ and ‘basil’ in the Prophecies of Nostradamus.
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© Koji Nihei Daijyo, 2013. All rights reserved.
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Koji Nihei Daijyo

Author:Koji Nihei Daijyo
We have covered 143 quatrains (§588-§730) concerning the World Events in the 19th century after Napoleonic ages [1821-1900] in the Prophecies of Nostradamus, and 219 in the 20th [1901-2000] (§731-§949).

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